Blog Post Showcase: Once an Addict always an Addict? By Bradley Riddell

click the image or any of the highlighted words to access the full blog post.

Hello everyone, and welcome to this ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In today’s post, Bradley talks to us about addiction, how it begins, what might trigger it, and how we can work with it in therapy.

A great point is that the individual must be ready to work on healing from the addiction and the underlying factors around it, in order to be able to get through this difficult time.

I hope you enjoy reading Bradley’s post, and his other posts I’ll be sharing on a regular basis.


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Blog Post Showcase: Angela Tulloch: Grief and Loss Poetry Part 6


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In Today’s post, Angela shares another lovely poem about grief, particularly in regard to boundaries and meeting our needs, which is also one of my favourite topics.

Make sure you read part 1, 2 , 3, 4 and 5.


Grief and Boundaries


You might find it difficult to express what you really want to say.  You mind pretend in order to please others.

Here’s a poem to encourage you in your personal and very individual journey with grief and loss.


What I really want


Is for you to stop saying it will be okay.

Things will get better.

At least he is not suffering.

At least she is in a better place.

Time is a healer.


What I really want to do


Is burst out of this bubble of fear and pretence.

Open my window, scream and shout.

I want to be angry.

I want to stay in bed all day.

That’s what I really want to do.


By Angela Tulloch


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Blog Post Showcase: Angela Tulloch: Grief and Loss Poetry Part 5


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In Today’s post, Angela shares another lovely poem about grief, particularly in regard to grief and culture.

Make sure you read part 1, 2 , 3, and 4.


Grief and Culture


We all grieve in different ways depending on your culture, religion and experiences.

Here’s a poem to encourage you in your personal and very individual journey with grief and loss.


Who said it should be this way?


Don’t judge me if I don’t wear black

Don’t judge me if I’m not sad

Don’t judge me if for that moment I smile when others cry.

Don’t judge me if I dare to dance again.

Don’t judge me if I dare to sing again.

Don’t judge me if I dare to love again.

Don’t judge me if I dare to live again.


By Angela Tulloch


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Blog Post Showcase: The Cycle of Addiction, written by: Bradley Riddell


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this week’s post, Bradley gives us an in depth look at the cycle of addiction.

In order to understand it, we need to get acquainted by the four parts of this cycle.

Once we’ve done this, we can start the change process, starting with the way we relate to our own thoughts and what to do when the cravings and difficult times arise.

Another important topic that Bradley touches on is instant gratification. We live in a day and age where getting things immediately is king. We have forgotten how to wait for things, but in regards to addiction, this can become even more precarious when trying to stop the cycle.

Bradley also speaks about making the unconscious stuff conscious. Knowing what is in our unconscious will helps us break the cycle.

If you need any help with addictions, get in touch with Bradley through his website here.

I’ll let Bradley tell you a bit more about this topic now in his full post.



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Blog Post Showcase: Maintaining your emotional wellbeing the Shinrin-Yoku way, written by: Kalpna Hirani


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this week’s blog post, Kalpna talks to us about Shinrin-Yoku, which is all about getting out in nature to help us keep mentally healthy.

Throughout the post, Kalpna guides us through the benefits of being outside and how these impact on our neurotransmitters, as their presence or absence also impacts our mental health.

Enjoy!



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Blog Post Showcase: Overcoming Unwanted Intrusive Thoughts: a “PRN” checklist, read as required, written by: Bradley Riddell


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this week’s post, Bradley gives us a summary of very important points you can use as “mantras” when feeling overwhelmed by intrusive thoughts.

PRN is a medical term which means “use as needed”. I found it helpful that Bradley added that term to his post, as these phrases will come in handy when intrusive thoughts want to take over your life at any particular moment.

I hope you enjoy this post and that these phrases will be helpful to you in times of need.



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Blog Post Showcase: Angela Tulloch: Grief and Loss Poetry Part 4


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In Today’s post, Angela shares another lovely poem about grief, particularly in regard to guilt and shame.

Make sure you read part 1, 2 and 3.


Grief and loss


Often people will have expectations of how you should respond to grief, and this can cause you to feel guilt and shame.

Here are some poems to encourage you in your personal and very individual journey with grief and loss.


Expectations


I stand in the shadows feeling no pain

I stand in the shadows expected to cry.

The eyes are upon me willing me to say something! Do something!

React this way or that way, anything, just show a sign.

I stand in the shadows feeling no pain

I stand in the shadows expected to cry.

The eyes are upon me willing me to say something! Do something!

React this way or that way, anything, just show a sign.

I stand in the shadows watching. 

Waiting, will there ever be a right time.

Do I hold onto others grief?

Or do I keep silence in the shadows of my own?


By Angela Tulloch


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Blog Post Showcase: Angela Tulloch: Grief and Loss Poetry (Part 3)


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In Today’s post, Angela speaks to us about Grief in the form of 3 lovely poems.

Make sure you check out Parts 1 and 2 as she gives us more insight into what grief and loss looks like, and gives some solace into different aspects of grief we might be struggling with, like “how long should we be grieving for”, and other important questions (an advance hint – there’s no set time for grief, it’s an ongoing process that changes as time goes by).

I’ve also written some blog posts on grief if you want to read those here.


The grief cake



1 Bucket of tears
1 Bucket of pain
and a bucket of regret

Then add

1 Bucket of pity
1 Bucket of denial
1 Bucket of shock
1 Bucket of guilt

Mix together in a large bowel of memories.
Empty in a tin of strength.
Bake in a hot oven of forgiveness
and decorate with a thick coating of love.


It still hurts


It still hurts to look at your grave.

It still hurts to put flowers in your place

It still hurts to wish you happy birthday

It still hurts to not hearing your voice on the telephone.

It still hurts.


Sweet peace


I am reassured to know you are somewhere safe

Safe you are in heaven

You are not alone, and it takes away the pain

Your last words were, we will meet again

Yes, I believe we will meet again.


Grief bus station


Grief got on at grief bus station in 2010 and again in 2012.


The journey was long and tiring.

I stopped at Shock Station in disbelief. 

I quickly arrived at denial stop where I was disoriented.

I got off for a while, then caught the number 9 bus to Pain Street. 

There the driver picked up weepy-in an uncontrollable state.


Weepy got off for a rest at I Cannot Bear It Avenue,

 before arriving at Reality Gardens.


Pain got on and sat next to a group of memories.

They chatted for a while and dared to smile. 

Just then guilt got on with blame. 

They talked about neglect,

short time spend and how things could have been.


When the grief bus arrived at the station,

grief was met by a glimmer of Hope holding the sign ‘Your journey starts here’


Need help working through a recent bereavement?

Why not give Angela a call or send her a message via this page.


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Blog Post Showcase: Angela Tulloch: Grief and Loss Poetry Part 2


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In Today’s post, Angela speaks to us about Grief, make sure you read part 1, in which Angela gave us a beautiful poem she wrote.

Part 3 will be out on Monday 13th July, which will be another few beautiful poems.


Grief and loss


Grief is something that we all will experience at some point in our life. 

Grief does not discriminate, and sometimes takes us unawares.

Some common symptoms to loss may include:

  • Shock and numbness, overwhelming sadness, crying, tiredness or exhaustion. 
  • You might express anger towards the person you have lost or the reason for your loss.
  • You might feel guilty about feeling angry, guilty about something you might have said during a disagreement, or not said, or not been able to stop your loved one from dying. 
  • You might have not been present when your loved one died.
  • You might feel guilty for not feeling anything at all. You might feel guilty for not crying or being sad.

These feelings may not be there all the time and may come in waves unexpectedly.



How do I grieve my loved ones?

There is no right or wrong way to grieve a loss.  We all cope differently.  How you grieve will depend on your personality, your faith, life experiences and how significant the loss was to you.  There is no time limit placed on grief.


Is there a time limit on how long I should grieve?


Healing from grief will take place over time, but it is a process that should not be rushed.  There is no time limit or fixed end when one should stop feeling the pain. 

 There may be days when you feel better and then a sudden memory is triggered by something someone said, a song, a smell or a visit to a memorable place, or you might just be deep in your thoughts.

Take grief at your own pace, be patient and don’t rush, everyone is different. 

 For some people it may be weeks or months, for others it is years. Sometimes you might feel guilty for not grieving your loss for the period expected by others. Sometimes you might feel guilty for feeling a little happier than the day before.

People may say words or comment, some might be unexpected or even hurt.  Things like;



Be strong


The loss of a loved one is an emotional time of deep pain. It often brings reflection of how things could have been. The plan of retirement or grandchildren, of a future together. What you are feeling is normal. You do not need to pretend or keep in your emotions.  Being able to show your true feelings will help you to cope better.



You have not cried since the death?


This does not mean you do not feel the pain deep inside, that keeps you awake late at night.  Yes, crying is a normal response to sadness, but it is not the only way to express sadness.



Are you still grieving after all these years?


There is no specific time on how long one should grieve.  How long it takes will depend on each person. There is a healing process taking place.


It has not been that long, and he is moved on already?


This is often difficult for those left behind, and you might feel guilty.  Moving on does not mean you have forgotten the person you love.  The memories will always be there but may not be as frequent.  There will always be an empty space in your life, but you will have learned ways to cope.  You have come to a place of acceptance, and able to build a life around your loss.

By Angela Tulloch

References: HelpGuide.org 


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Blog Post Showcase: Angela Tulloch: Grief and Loss Poetry


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In Today’s post, Angela speaks to us about Grief in the form of a poem. There are two more blogs to come after this one, so keep an eye out and make sure to subscribe so you don’t miss them. They’re really good!


Grief and loss

The journey without an end.


Is what I’m feeling normal?


This emotional suffering I am feeling is overwhelming. 

 I am told it is a natural response to loss. 

My emotions come and go, like waves on a rough sea.   

Sometimes together, sometimes on their own. 

Shock, anger, disbelief, guilt, and profound sadness.

They appear suddenly.

Sometimes they stay awhile.

I struggle to get the thoughts out of my head.


They say it is a normal reaction to loss.


 My health and sleep are often disturbed.

 Sometimes I struggle to fall asleep

And struggle to get out of bed.

My appetite is not what it used to be.


They say it is a normal reaction to loss.


I do not know how I am really supposed to feel,

but it does not feel normal to me. 

I have lost that sparkle,

I do not smile or laugh anymore,

and people are noticing. 


They say it is a normal reaction to loss.


I sometimes lose my patience over the smallest of things,

and rather be on my own. 

My body feels weak, my head like it does not belong.

I want to scream, but I dare not in case I cannot stop. 


They say it is a normal reaction to loss.


I noticed couples, I noticed mothers and fathers,

Sisters and brothers, children, babies and grandparents. 

I noticed people are happy and having fun.  The smallest of things seems to magnify my loss.


They say it is a normal reaction to loss.


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Thought of the Day – Mini Blog Series (Intro)

Hi everyone!

I know, I’ve been quiet for a while, but I hope you’ve been enjoying the Practical Steps to Blogging posts from colleagues that have completed my workshop with onlinevents.

In this post, I’d like to introduce a new series, possibly ongoing for the next few months to a year. Maybe longer, let’s see how this goes!

My thinking with this series is that I’ve written over 200 blog posts since July 31st 2017, and there’s a lot of content there to expand on and explore further.

So, I’m going to be digging into each blog post, from the first one to the last one, and write some “thoughts for the day” to help me and whoever reads these posts to reflect on self-care, mental wellbeing, supervision, and other topics (thanks to my followers by email and on social media by the way, your support is fully appreciated and so are your comments!).

I do hope you enjoy these mini-blogs.

I look forward to your comments on social media or at the bottom of the posts.

I’d also like to welcome suggestions on topics you might want me to discuss in these mini blogs.

I’m not sure yet of the frequency, I’m going to test it out for every other day, we’ll see what happens!

For now, I leave you with my blog subscription form so you can continue to receive these in your inbox as they are published.

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Blog Post Showcase: Thoughts from Kalpna Hirani

Kalpna Psychology Today Profile – Click Image Above

Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

Today I’ll be sharing Kalpna’s social media posts, so you can find her on social media and follow her for more great content!


Facebook post – Click the Banner

Kalpna urges us to reflect on our thinking and why it matters when responding to what goes on around us, what people tell us, what we hear, and what we perceive.

Kalpna’s Facebook Page

Kalpna’s LinkedIn Profile


LinkedIn Post – click the banner

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Blog Post Showcase: Is trouble sleeping keeping you up at night? – 5 Practical Tips for getting a good night’s sleep, written by: Haley Ruth


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this week’s post, Haley gives us some helpful tips on how to get a good night’s sleep.



Haley goes straight into the five tips in this post.

She’s quick to remind us that everyone is different, and it’s important that you find the things that will help you as an individual.

Perhaps these 5 tips will prompt you to think about how you can help yourself get a better night’s sleep?

I hope so. Enjoy the post!



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Blog Post Showcase: 5 reasons why you’re not into self-care; Written by Lizandra Leigertwood


Hello everyone, and welcome to this ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In today’s post, Lizandra talks about a topic that’s very dear to my heart. I’ve got a series of blog posts on this topic, as well as a book, which you can find in my blogsite and in my amazon author page.



Lizandra starts out reframing the true meaning of self-care, rather than sticking with the cliche that it’s become, “diluting” it’s purpose in our lives.

Read on to find out the real meaning behind self-care, and how forgetting to look after yourself might impact on your psychological, physical and relational life.

Finally, Lizandra gives us 5 reasons why we’re not into self-care.

I hope this post helps you reflect on how you look after yourself, and that you might be able to allow yourself some more time, time that you deserve!



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Video post showcase: why do you self-sabotage potential relationships, Vlog by Ryan Grey.


Hello everyone, and welcome to this new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this week’s post, I’m sharing Ryan Grey’s Vlog titled “why do you self-sabotage potential relationships”.

You can find out more about Ryan Grey’s counselling practice via this link.



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Blog Post Showcase – Low self esteem: a self help guide, written by Kathy Shaw


Hello everyone, and welcome to this ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this week’s post, Katy talks to us about low self-esteem, and gives us a self-help guide to working through this particular issue.



Katy gently takes us through the different aspects of self-esteem: what is it? what affects it? how does it affect us?

Then Katy gives us some tips to improve our self-esteem, breaking it down into 8 different things we can do to help ourselves.

Have a read of the full post here.



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Blog post showcase: whose space is it anyway? by: Manda Glanfield


Hello everyone, and welcome to this ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.



Today’s post comes from Manda Glandfield, and is all about how we manage our physical and personal space, especially in light of the social distancing guidance.

I love the title, as it’s similar to one of mine – mine is about relationships. You can read it here.

Manda, through a personal anecdote, shows us how she went from anxious to finding her peace in a busy street, and helps us explore how we can find that for ourselves as well, in whatever way works best for us.

She sets a balance between being separated from others, and our human need for connection. She leaves us with a question about how to move forward…



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Blog Post Showcase – Hayley Ruth: Re-thinking our new normal (Dealing with the anxiety of coming out of lock-down)


Hello everyone, and welcome to this ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.



In this post, Haley talks to us about re-thinking our “new normal” as we start coming out of lockdown.

This post was written originally on May 11th, so things are moving a big more as we start the month of June.

Haley challenges us with considering what parts of “normal” we’d like to get back to, after experiencing a bit more quiet and contemplation maybe, or a different kind of relating with those in our household, or even working from home!

Finally, Haley runs us through an exercise that can help deal with uncertainty and plan for the future.


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Blogpost Showcase: Date night – do you make time? by Joanne Mander

Hello everyone, and welcome to this ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this week’s post, Joanne introduces her post about making time in relationships, particularly setting up a date night with our partner.

She helps us reflect and think about our busy lives, and how to take back some of our busy time to have in-depth conversations and quality time with our partner in life.

I’ll be updating these posts as I receive links to colleague’s blog posts. Keep an eye out for these!

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Blog Post Showcase – Eight areas for focused attention for more peaceful and fulfilled lives, for our generation and those that follow – by: Sarah Jayne Buchanan from Sarah’s Prayers

Hello everyone, and welcome to this ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this post, Sarah writes about eight areas for focused attention for more peaceful and fulfilled lives, for our generation and those that follow.

Sarah talks to us about the importance of having a place to set down roots, as well as how to nurture and look after our bodies.

She’ll also remind us about synergy, telling and recalling our story, remembering our purpose and our ability to be creative.

Finally, Sarah will show us how to live a balanced life, particularly speaking to mothers, and how this is an ever-evolving process in life.

You can read Sarah’s post here.

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A message for you in this time of crisis. Regular blog posts will resume at a later time.

On behalf of Stacey Sabido from Serenity for you and Karin Brauner from KB Bilingual Services, we’d like to offer our support through these hard times.

We will continue our work online, and we hope that you’ll reach out if you need us.

We have decided to halt our regular blog series on hoarding as things progress.

Here is Stacey’s message to everyone:

“During this current situation we would like to offer you our words of support.
Please remember to stay safe & although these are difficult times, we can use it to appreciate our loved ones, appreciate life & focus on what we would like to achieve.
Let’s spend quality time with our kids, get more involved with their learning.
Do things that we never had the time to do before like decluttering the house, meditating, working on unfinished projects.
Together we can get through this 💛

Stay safe, stay in touch via mobile devices, keep eating as well as possible, exercise at home, practice mindfulness and meditation or anything that will help you get through this difficult time.

Take care one and all.

Karin and Stacey.

Business Mindset for Private Practitioners


Hi, and welcome to this new series that I’ll be publishing once a month on Mondays.

I have a few reasons for posting this series now.

The first one is that over a year ago, I started supporting private practitioners to get into the marketing mindset, so they can get the clients they want and that need their support.

The second reason is that I’m reading a book called The Business Book, in which I’m learning how to grow my business further, and thought I’d share my learning with everyone.

I’ve also joined an Author Academy that has given me a new tribe to rely on and lots of resources to develop my products and services further.


If you’d like to find out about these, click the affiliate links below:

6-figure Author 5 day challenge

Author: Create 18 streams of income out of your book

Set fire to your business and brand

Become Unhackable


It all starts with an Idea


Do you sit sometimes and think things like:

“I know a lot about this topic, I could offer some services around that”

“Ah that’s a great idea, but how can I get that idea to help others and bring me income in the process?”

“I want to do A, B, C ….. Z, but just thinking of all the work it requires, and all the ideas I have, I’m already overwhelmed”

I have had these thoughts, and some of them have required a mindset change on my part.

Patience and perseverance have also played their part.

I still have many ideas that haven’t come to fruition. I’m working on them.

If you’re like me, you have lots of things to do on the side of your self-employment / entrepreneurial life. Sometimes these things help, other times they make us stop, take stock, regroup and figure out how we’re going to move forward.


Every new idea comes with a risk.

It’s scary to put ourselves out there and either succeed or hear crickets (note I didn’t say fail).

Succeeding is just as scary as hearing crickets or seeing hay bales go across your screen…

According to the authors, we must combine our idea with entrepreneurial spirit.

This basically means that we are willing to take a risk by developing our idea and creating great products and services with it.


Development of a new product or service means we might have to start learning new skills, how to use new tech, do some research on the things already on offer, as well as plan, plan, plan!

This takes time and effort.

If you’ve got life stuff going on – health issues, physical or mental, people to look after, another part time job to help pay the bills – it might mean that it will take longer to develop this idea.

I know I’m struggling with regrouping right now and realising that my time is limited and I need to look after myself.

My priority as ever are my clients – counselling, supervision, tutoring, coaching and content. My energies are invested in them on the days I offer these sessions.

The rest of my time is for admin and rest. Depending on how I’m feeling, rest might take precedent over admin. I might do the bare minimum some weeks.

When we have limited time, but a willingness to support more people than we can in our one-to-one sessions, it feels like everything is urgent.


Prioritise and Be Realistic


The authors propose to have realistic propositions, which includes having an idea and then thinking “finance”.

Now I’ve grown my one-to-one service in a very frugal way. I’ve tried the Facebook Ads and Wordads, but I did those at a time where I didn’t have an audience and it flopped. I might give them a go in the near future, when I have courses and other products on offer and have the capital to spend on them.

Social media is a great way to market yourself for free, and I’ve taken advantage of that possibility. It’s meant that I can put content out there and support the general public and colleagues with great content.

So, the authors suggest we consider whether we need a lot or a little capital, or maybe we don’t need much to start with.

Consider what you need. For example, counsellors might want to pay to be a member of BACP or UKCP, NCS, or any of the others out there. Also being a part of directories will help them get clients. Networking events might cost some money as well.

Start with what you can afford without getting into money worries, and grow your capital for these activities as you grow your business.


If you’re going to the bank to ask for a loan, you’ve got to have a good business plan.

It is easier to get a loan if you’re employed (I know this from personal experience – I got a loan when I was on a 30hr permanent contract, without much fuss…but got denied a loan a couple of years later as I was part employed, part self-employed). Check with your bank what the requirements are if you’re self-employed!

Financial backers will look at your idea and figure out if it’s profitable.

If you don’t require much money to get started, then go for it! If you’ve thought it’s a valuable idea and will benefit others, then why not try it out!


Do something different to stand out – see what’s already out there


Finding out what’s already out there and what will make your products or services different is key.

I say this to people attending my Practical Steps to Blogging Online Workshops:

Nobody knows what you know, how you know it or present it to them. It will be valuable to the people that need to hear your message.

You will already have an edge because of that.

How else can you make yourself stand out?

There is lots of advice out there from business coaches and it can get confusing and daunting as some will say do A B C and others will say definitely don’t do A B C, it doesn’t work!

My best advice on this is, read what they have to say, and do what feels congruent for you.

What works for them might work for you too, or something else might come up that really helps you build your offering reach.

An important thing to develop is the Know, Like, Trust Factor. You can do this in many ways, but the key thing is: (metaphorically) shout that you exist!

For example, if you create an amazing website, but nobody knows about it, you’ll never sell or get clients. You have to guide people to your site to get the business you want.

That is a subject for another post, but promoting yourself is key!


The authors suggest that, once you’ve established yourself and your product or service, it’s time to maintain sales and figure out how you’re going to grow your business in the short and long term.

Don’t allow your business to get stale. Keep innovating, finding new ways to do things.

I’m in the process of starting podcasts, vlogs. It will take time but I’ll get there. I’m pacing myself but I have an idea of where I want to get to.

I am also starting to do workshops online and offering other things like courses (also will take time but I will get there!)

All of this has meant a huge mindset change and re-adjustment.

I’m being kind to myself whilst I readjust and figure out how to do this and grow my business offerings further.


The authors also talk about hiring people.

Now, I got into private practice to work by myself, be my own boss. But I’ve become so busy that I couldn’t do something that I enjoyed any longer, but needed to keep doing in order to keep “top of mind” on social media.

I’ve hired a VA that schedules my social media posts. I have the final say whether I want to change an image or some of the text, but in general she’s doing most of the work. I only spend like 10min (rather than 3hrs) a week on these posts.

It’s freed so much time!


I’m sure she could be doing so much more for me. It’s a mindset change to have someone do stuff for you, so I’m working on that at the moment.

For now I’m happy to keep my social media posts going!


A final note on all I’ve said above.

Self-Care should be key when building and developing your business.

If we don’t look after ourselves, we won’t be able to do any of the work we are dreaming of.

If you want to find out more, I’ve got a very practical book called 20 Self-Care Habits, which comes together with a free Facebook Group, coaching sessions (paid), and in the future some new products and services.


Reference: The Business Book: Sam Atkinson et al. (2014). Big Ideas Simply Explained. Dorling Kindersley Limited, pages 18-19


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Hoarding: Practical Steps to Staging an Intervention


Hi, and welcome to this week’s blog post on our series on Hoarding.

The last couple of posts, we have been preparing you for taking this important step to support your loved one.

In the second post, we talked about planning the steps before staging the intervention, and making sure it is the right way to go with your particular hoarder in mind.

Checking other avenues before staging an intervention might be key as it might not actually be necessary – this will depend on the hoarders’ state of mind and openness to conversations about their current situation.


Let’s get right to the steps we might need to take into account when working towards the date you’ve scheduled your intervention for.


The main thing to keep in mind, we believe, is to back up everything you say and do during the intervention.

This will build up your confidence before and during the meeting, and ensure the best results possible.

Of course, we can’t guarantee your loved one’s reactions or whether they’ll take your support.

All you can do is try, and trying will be appreciated, now or later.


Another thing to be mindful of is that they might not say “yes” to your support straight away.

They might need some time to think about it, and work through any feelings that might come up for them during the session (anger, sadness, guilt, shame, resentment, and other strong emotions might come up for your loved one during the sessions, and this is OK.)


Be prepared for those strong emotions, and be ready to sit with these as they come up.


Finding ways to keep everyone safe is key and a therapist will help you get strategies and ideas in place so you can build up your resilience and anticipate these strong emotions and your responses to them as they arise.

This is where having a session with a therapist, like myself, might be helpful.


I (Karin) have trained to be able to sit with a variety of different situations that bring up strong emotions in my clients, and an intervention will certainly bring a lot of stuff up!

Through Stacey’s website, you can book an initial call with her, and then she’ll put you in touch with me (or you can contact me directly, and I’ll liaise with Stacey in order to support you in the best and most holistic way possible).


Having spoken to a professional organiser and therapist will give you more tools to prepare what you’ll say.

Having a team behind you will show your loved one that you’re serious about helping them, and that you’ve done your homework before addressing this directly with them.


During your planning, take into account the personal experience and situation of your loved one, as well as their personality and the ways they respond to difficult conversations and situations in their lives.


You know them best, and this will help you plan your words carefully, in a way that will be compassionate, caring, and aware of their autonomy and right to make decisions that, to everyone else, might seem like “wrong” decisions.


Writing down what you want to say will be important.

We’ve all been there, we have all the things planned out in our minds, and when it comes to the moment of having the conversation, we get diverted, or emotions get the best of us and we miss out saying all we wanted to say.


We might also get nervous and forget half of the stuff we wanted to say that might have been helpful.

Getting together to plan this will make your intervention more fruitful.

Again, it will also build your confidence in what you are tackling, and build the team’s trust and confidence in one another.

Each member can take up one item on the list of things you want to run through with the hoarder, lightening the load for everyone.


Even though Stacey and I are available online as well as in person, we can’t be available to everyone, especially if in a different part of the country, so get in touch us for conversations about your particular situation, and we’ll do our best to help out with as much as we can.

In the case where Stacey can’t travel to your location to help with the decluttering process, we recommend you get in touch with local businesses that help with decluttering, and places where your loved one can donate their belongings.

Stacey works with Shelter, which is a great charity to work with!


By mentioning donation, your loved one might also be given food for thought regarding making a difference in someone else’s life, by giving their unwanted clutter to someone who will benefit from it once they’ve taken the step to get rid of it.

Finally there are two more steps to take to ensure your intervention runs as smoothly as possible:


Trial run!

Get together with the team that will be present during the intervention – friends, family, professionals – and plan for as many eventualities as possible.

Putting your heads together to figure out how to tackle each arising challenge, and writing down (as mentioned above) what you want to talk about, will be key.


Summary sheet

Providing a summary of what the meeting was about, and what you spoke about, as well as including services and people you’ve contacted to enquire about hoarding support, will allow your loved one to go away and think about these things.

You can include our blog post links if you’d like.

A summary sheet will allow them to read the content and spend time thinking about what they want to do about their hoarding issue.

This sheet might also be a great starting point for them to get the help they need, both psychological and practical.


If anything has come up for you while reading this post, do get in touch to discuss this. Stacey and Karin will be happy to help!



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Blog Post Showcase, Christmas Edition: Loneliness Reflections, by Paula Newman


Hi everyone, and welcome to our Christmas blog, by one of the graduates of my Practical Steps to Blogging Workshop via Onlinevents Experiential Workshops.

Over the Christmas season, we have many emotions. Some of us really enjoy this time of the year, whilst others struggle with everything that this holiday season entails.

In this post, Paula talks to us about her reflections on loneliness…

From relationships to mental health…to how we deal with our inner self and our shame…and finally to how counselling can help us address loneliness.

Click on either of the images, or here, to read the full post.

Whatever you’re doing, however you’re feeling this holiday season, know that you’re not alone.

There are many of us that understand and are here to help.


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What is Hoarding?


Hi, and welcome to this edition of our Hoarding mini-series.

In this week’s post we’ll be talking about what hoarding is, from a psychological and a practical perspective.


The psychological effects of hoarding are intertwined with the more tangible aspects of hoarding.

For example, when someone that’s hoarding collects more possessions, they have an emotional reaction to this.

They get something new for their home, they get a strong reaction.

Some of the reactions are positive – an adrenaline and endorphin rush that gives the hoarder a happy feeling, which reinforces the behaviour of acquiring more things to continue getting that happy feeling.

For others, it might be frustrating to be buying more things they know they don’t need and really don’t want but can’t stop themselves from buying.

There’s a pull towards that accumulation of material things, which most likely has an underlying, mostly unconscious origin.

The unconscious pull is strong and undetectable unless talked through with a counsellor or psychotherapist that will help the hoarder to work through their difficult past (distant or recent) that might have led them into hoarding.


There are more emotions that hoarding can bring up for the hoarder and their family and friends.

The consequences to the environment are also important because they might impact on the hoarder’s personal and professional lives.

Stacey now will talk to us about this a bit further.


Hoarding is when a person is saving lots of different items within their home regardless of whether or not those items add any value to their lives.

According to the mental health charity Mind, if you hoard, you might:

  • Have very strong positive feelings whenever you get more items added to your home   
  • Feel very upset or anxious at the thought of throwing or giving things away any items that you have accummalated   
  • Find it very hard to decide what to keep or what to get rid of

The charity also states that, hoarders may believe the following:

  • That they need to keep things for the future
  • That they will not be able to cope with how they feel if somebody were to start throwing things away
  • Throwing things away will harm other people or the environment
  • You have to keep things because you must not waste them
  • You should arrange or dispose of things perfectly or not at all
  • Your belongings are making you happy or keeping you safe
  • Your belongings are all unique and special, even if they are very similar
  • You simply need more storage space, or more time to sort things out.

Lots of people share some of these beliefs to an extent, but don’t feel them as strongly or as part of hoarding.   

Hoarding could affect you in lots of different ways, some examples below are:

  • It can lead to health and safety issues such as being unable to leave your home quickly in case of an emergency.
  • Feeling embarrassed and ashamed of your home which could lead to feelings of isolation. This feeling of isolation could happen because you do not want people to visit your home and to not know about your situation.
  • You could struggle to stay on top of paying bills or finding important paperwork that you need to stay organised because of the clutter that you live in.
  • Buying the same items that you already have but you do not realise this because you cannot find them.
  • Avoid letting visitors into your home which could lead to housing or safety problems as those visitors could be trying to carry out repairs or safety checks in your home.
  • Your personal hygiene could be affected in extreme cases where you cannot access your bathroom or washing machine.
  • Your health could be affected in cases where you cannot access the kitchen properly or there is no space in your fridge to store, prepare, cook and eat healthy food for you and/or your family.
  • You could be restricted from accessing areas of your home due to it being very cluttered for example, your bedroom or hallways.
  • Children could be affected by a person with a hoarding disorder. Where severe hoarding exists, families rarely have any space at all and are forced to combine bedroom spaces inappropriately, for example an older child could be forced to sleep in the same bed as a parent. Sometimes children can be forced to live in one space that serves multiple functions. For example where there is space on a sofa, this sofa could be used for sleeping, doing homework or eating.

If you recognise any of the things mentioned in this post, for yourself or a friend or relative, don’t hesitate to get in touch.

We can help with the practical – Stacey is a professional organiser – and the psychological – Karin is a counsellor working online.


See you next week!


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Blog Post Showcase: Successful Private Practice – my ‘why’, by Antonia Higgins


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this week’s post, Tonia writes to us about her own workshop, Successful Private Practice, and tells us a bit about why she’s offering this workshop.



Why you’re in great hands with Antonia supporting you via this workshop

Why is she offering this workshop

Why Antonia is qualified to present this workshop

Find out more about the meaning of success in private practice

Get some practical tips and know-how

And of course, how to book.



I’ll be updating these Wednesday posts as I receive links to colleague’s blog posts. Keep an eye out for these!

You can also subscribe in the form below if you want to get them straight in your inbox as they are published.


(psst, the video in the post was created by yours truly)


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Private Practice Mini-Series: Creating the mental space that leads clients to find us


Hi, and welcome to this mini series aimed at practitioners in private practice, and anyone who works one-to-one with clients.

This will be a three-post series where I’ll be talking about

1. Creating the mental space that leads clients to find us

2. Calling things out so that they become a reality in our lives and businesses

3. Ghosting: a private practitioner’s initiation rite of passage


I’ve been in private practice for nearly 7 years now, and I’ve learned a lot.

Some things I wished I’d learned when I’d started, but that’s not always possible.

It is because of this that I’ve launched some services (free and paid), like this blog, to support practitioners that are just starting out now, to know about things that will get them started with more knowledge than I had when I started.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I like how things have panned out. I love how my practice and life are going. But I know this might not be the case for everyone.

Keep reading if you want to find out about this week’s topic and what I mean by creating mental space.


I’ll write a bit about how I started out and how I got to where I am today.

In 2013, I decided to launch my website and get online on directories so I could get clients. I was also working 37+ hours at a care job (which I enjoyed, but my sights were changing more towards full time private practice, only a dream at this point!).

From that point onward, I had started to lower my hours at that job and spending more time on counselling.

The first two years I didn’t have that many clients. Which was fine because I was renting a room and finding it difficult to find the right times to fit clients anyway.

In 2015 I got a Senior Care Officer contract at a children’s home, which was temporary until November. When that contract finished, it gave me the freedom to work as relief staff, which meant I could choose what days to work and what days to dedicate to my private practice.


This is where it starts to get good!


A month or so before my Senior contract ended, I started thinking more and more about dedicating Mondays and Thursdays to private practice. Just thinking about it did something…

It was almost magic!

By the time my contract ended, I had quite a few more enquiries.

I booked them in, and by the end of the year I’d gone from 1-2 regular clients to 4-8 regular clients!

I got a contract as a support worker in the same children’s home on February 2016, but took only 16hrs per week, which meant I could still dedicate Mondays and Thursdays to counselling and building my business.

My manager there has always been kind enough to accommodate my other responsibilities outside of that job. And as I was working very part time only, it was all good.

That year I did my last waking night shift. That’s how I started letting go of doing extra shifts and focusing more on my private work. By mid 2017 I stopped doing extra shift.


Another dramatic shift came about when I decided to finally give blogging a good chance and take it seriously. This meant taking promoting my blog seriously as well.

And this in turn meant posting regularly and consistently on social media.


I was still counselling Mondays and Thursdays, but decided to start offering sessions on Wednesdays as well.

I got more clients. I also started offering supervision.

I created the mental space for those clients and supervisees, and lo and behold, they contacted and booked!


My last two years at the care job were spent daydreaming about only running my own business.

I planned for it.

I made the mental space for the clients that I needed – a mix of counselling, supervisees, coaching and tutoring clients.

I also started thinking about other services and products to offer.

I wrote 20 Self-Care Habits, which came from a series of blogs I wrote.

I began planning other avenues of income and work.

In July 2019, I left the care job. I miss the social aspects of it and the young people I worked with.

But it wasn’t for me anymore.


I worked 11 years as a support worker in different areas. It gave me lots of knowledge that includes being able to offer counselling to autistic and other neurodiverse people.

My practice is now full to the brim. My products and services are being created slowly but surely.

More books are in the pipeline, as well as collaborations with colleagues and companies to create more mental space to help more clients and colleagues with their lives and careers.


Those who know me will know that I didn’t write this to brag. I’m more in awe of how things are going than anyone else!

I wrote this to show my fellow colleagues what is possible when we work hard, when we get the training, CPD, support from one another, and put ourselves out there.


I hope this post has been helpful to those starting out, and allowed those more seasoned practitioner to reflect on the amazing journey we’re all in…

…doing what we love, whilst at the same time helping our clients and colleagues get back on track, or get their businesses going.

I look forward to writing to you next week.

Until then…


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Total Health Summit – 10th October



Experience “Total Health” by balancing body, mind, emotions, and spirit.


Total Health Summit™: Join us and explore tools and techniques to attain equanimity and unity of body, mind, emotions, and spirit.


Hi, and welcome to this week’s blog post!


This week I’d like to share with you about a project I’ve been collaborating with.

I’ve been talking about boundaries, meeting our needs and responsibility with Keith Engelhardt, the mastermind behind the Total Health Summit.

It’s been fun to record the interview with him and to interview a couple of colleagues!



So what’s this summit about?


The aim of this year’s online summit is to get more people to experience “total health” by balancing body, mind, emotions and spirit.


Achieve work/life balance and total health by:

Learning how to reduce stress.

Envision decreasing being overwhelmed by work or life.

Visualise learning how to find balance.


The varied knowledge and experience of each of the speakers will allow you to target different areas of your life: physical, mental, and spiritual.

The best part is that it is free to watch for a limited time!

The silver and gold passes are affordable and they come with yearly access community where you can continue to learn and share with like-minded people.


Find out who more about the speakers by clicking here.


Learning how to deal with stress, stressful situations and find balance in life is important, and there is more than one way to achieve it.

This is why I highly recommend tuning in on October 10th to the Total Total Health Summit.

I hope to see you there!


Counsellors Working with Neurodiversity – Facebook Group


Hi, and welcome to this week’s post.

I’ve been posting about Autism in my series, and I’d like to end this part of it with letting you know about a Facebook group that has been set up with the aim of supporting neurodiverse clients in the therapy room.


We created this group with the aim to bring counsellors to get together to discuss neurodiversity in a safe space.

Our goal is not only for therapists to know how to work with the neurodiverse population, but also to raise awareness of what neurodiversity and autism actually entails.


I watched a show yesterday and the guy was talking about diversity, but he said he like the word “representation” better.

It was very timely that I saw this, I think. He was talking about race but it applies here as well.

We want to represent the autistic and neurodiverse population in a positive and empowering manner.


It is because of the imbalance in information and inclusion of neurodiverse groups that we believe in working together, without creating an “us” and “them” environment.

With that in mind, in our group we use “I” statements when we are expressing ourselves, in order to keep away from it becoming polarised.

We encourage conversations, and using “I” statements, helps avoid confusion, misunderstandings, and provides a safe space to have all kinds of conversations, without the need to stop them or “close commenting”, which might happen but it’s been rare with the way we’re running the group.


We purposely sought out Lisa Cromar to be part of the group, as it would be silly to create a group for neurodiverse counsellors without having that voice in the group.

It brings that power balance back to just that – balance. We don’t know everything, we don’t have “insiders” experience as “NTs” which is why, behind the scenes, we ask Lisa to let us know if we’re on the right track or not.


We believe that, as admins, it’s important to keep communicating with each other.

We all have roles in the group, and communicating about each action that we need to take, is making it a safe place for us to admin but also a safe place for counsellors and psychotherapists to further the conversations and cause for the neurodiverse population.


As a group, we understand that there is completely justified anger from both autistic and neurotipicals about the treatment of autistic people – the misunderstandings, the backchat, the looks.

General discrimination and lack of knowledge doesn’t help either.
What we are trying to do with our lovely group is work as a team, a mutually respected team of NDs and NTs.


This is a safe space to feel and be equals. We are all counsellors after all and that unites us firstly.

We are united in the cause to support and remove barriers between society and neurodiversity – this of course will take time, but if we change our attitudes and channel our anger and discomfort in a joint endeavour, then that will bring us further than if we “divide and conquer”.


This group is all about empowerment – to state your opinion, to be supported (within the limitations of a facebook group – it’s not a support or therapy group, or supervision).



If this group is something that sounds like something you’d like to be a part of, feel free to join via this link.


Before I let you go for today, here’s a bit on all the admins of the group:


Lisa Cromar

Lisa is a Person-Centred (PC) counsellor who specialises in working with autistic clients, she provides counselling at a college in the Northwest. Lisa also supervises and trains placement counsellors working at Cheshire Autism Practical Support (ChAPS), a charity which supports autistic people and their families. Additionally, she provides autism awareness workshops training counsellors in how to make counselling more accessible to this client group, increasing counsellor confidence in working with this group which is currently known to be generally low. She has Aspergers and has children with Aspergers and autism. 

Lisa is the author of the pioneering literature review: Exploring the Efficacy of  Person-Centred Counselling for Autistic People, published in the spring 2019 edition of The Person Centred Quarterly (PCQ) . Lisa’s eventual career goal is to assume responsibility for pioneering a version of person-centred counselling for autistic people, Lisa has just embarked on a PhD at The University of Chester to help to realise this dream


Sarah Williams

I’m Sarah and I work in a person centred way, in simple terms this means that I listen with empathy, and I will always regard you and your experiences with compassion and understanding. My approach is real and genuine. I am a specialist trauma counsellor, with over eight years experience working with survivors of rape and sexual abuse. Since qualifying I have counselled adults with autism (sometimes referred to as Asperger’s syndrome)

https://www.indigocounselling.co.uk/


Heidi Brown

I am a Person Centred Counsellor working in Manchester city centre, who enjoys empowering people to make the best decisions for themselves.

I work alongside people as they unlock their potential.

I love to see people grow and develop.

My specialities are autism and work related stress.

Www.heidibrowncounselling.com

Karin Brauner


I was born in Guatemala City, Guatemala, where I lived for the first 25 years of my life. I am now settled  in Brighton and Hove, which I love – I have access to the countryside, the city, the sea, and a melting pot of cultures and activities.

I have a private practice in Brighton and Hove and Online, working with Spanish and English speaking clients with a wide range of life difficulties.

My approach is psychodynamic at its base, but I adapt my therapeutic approach with each individual client, drawing from other modalities and work experience. I believe building good rapport and a good relationship with my clients will help both of us work together to gain insights and freedom from feelings that might be stuck in the past or left unprocessed or repressed.

You can find out more about Karin via the AboutMe page at the top of this blog.

Facebook Group Description

Welcome to ‘Counsellors working with Neurodiversity’. Set up as a resource and a meeting place for UK counsellors to share their knowledge, expertise, events, CPD courses and/or workshops. In the areas for example of Autism, Dyslexia, ADHD; although not exclusive to these aspects.

This group will not be discussing client work, please take it to supervision or contact www.k-brauner-counselling.co.uk/clinical-supervision. Admin will be monitoring strictly to ensure that confidentiality is protected. This rule is for client and counsellor protection alike.

Any posts that are deemed unsafe will be deleted. We hope that counsellors working with neurodiversity can come together here to help and support each other. With the aim of promoting the acceptance of cognitive difference, that seems to be stigmatised as negative within a more standardised model. If you join this group you are agreeing to the terms of use.

This Facebook group will use as default the term ‘autistic’ when describing a person with autism. A survey by the National Autistic Society (NAS) of 3470 which included 502 autistic adults found that the term ‘autistic’ was preferred by a large percentage of the autistic participants.

Please see below an extract from the NAS website which we support:-

‘The language we use is important because it embodies and can therefore help change attitudes towards autism. To reflect the findings of this research, the NAS has begun to gradually increase the use of the term ‘autistic’ – particularly when talking about and to adults in that group.’ We recognise, that there will be autistic people who prefer the term ‘person with autism,’ and it is obviously important to use each individual’s preference at those times.

For more information on the rationale behind this preference, please see links below:- https://www.autism.org.uk/about/what-is/describing.aspxhttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1362361315588200


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Why have therapy in your own language? (and why I offer this service)

Hi, and welcome to today’s post, where I’ll be focusing on the importance of our native language when going to therapy.


I will focus on Spanish and English in this post as those are the two languages I speak fluently and to a native level.

This applies to other languages as well – substitute these as is convenient throughout this post.


The importance of having therapy in our native language will depend on many factors, such as when we started learning and speaking English (or another language), and how comfortable and confident we are with the language.

But we must be more than comfortable and confident speaking it fluently.

This comfort and confidence must also be in relation to our emotional language.



There are some things we learned to process in our native language that will be tricky to translate into our second or third language.

Here are some things to consider and think about, that point toward the importance of having therapy in our first language.


The use of language varies from very simple, to more complex, and being able to do this might require time and effort and practice.

As mentioned above, our ability to process emotional and more complex information in a second language will take time.

I was lucky enough to have moved here with a high level of English, but I know that this is not the case for many people that choose to move to another country with a language different than theirs.

I see clients that speak Spanish because they want to be able to fully express themselves and that means using emotional language that they’re used to since they were children.

It is not that they can’t communicate it in English, it is just that there might be no emotional link to the words in this second language, and that is an important aspect of processing emotional stuff.


When we are distressed, the last thing we want to do is try to find the words in a language that is not our first.

Moving to a new country with a new language that we might or might not be familiar with, is daunting in itself.

The culture might be radically or slightly different to where they moved from.

This in itself can cause a great deal of anxiety and worry.

Add to that trying to find services in a new country that we have no idea how it works (I had this when I moved here, not with the language, but with how to find a GP, how to sign up, where to go for this or that, and I had the language, it was everything else that was new! As time passed, my confidence grew and it was all fine, but it took time…)

Trying to navigate new surroundings and ways of doing things might get us into fight, flight, freeze reactions, and finding someone to speak to in our own language, that fully gets us, will be helpful in moving forward with our new lives.


Feeling understood might mean we feel like we are sitting in front of someone that understands our culture a bit better because the common language, and also will understand our nuances, if we were to go into “slang” or more colloquial wording that a non-native speaker might not grasp unless we explain it.

I also teach Spanish, and with more advanced students I sometimes forget myself and start speaking in slang. They generally like this as they get an experience from a native’s perspective. They can see how people might speak when in the company of other Spanish speakers and they generally find it insightful and amusing.

In the therapy room, speaking in this same manner to a client, in a colloquial, culturally similar way, might help them feel less alone and at ease with their new lives.

Adapting to the changes might become more manageable if there is someone around that can help them through the uncertainty, distress when navigating these new ways of doing things and speaking in a new language too.

I’ve also done interpreting work for people, working with them through a benefits claim or a GP appointment.

Latin Americans in particular have a way with words that means we tell a long story about many things – not everyone, not all the time, I’m generalising – it is important that, in the case of myself as an interpreter, that I explain to the professional that I will let them know what the person is saying once they’re done telling their story.

It might be my therapeutic background, but I’d never interrupt and tell someone “get to the point” or “just answer the question” which is probably what the professional wanted at that point. Instead, I can explain to them “we are very wordy in our countries, it’s all fine, you’ll get your answer in a moment”.

Normalising for both sides might be important at this point.

If it’s just me and the client in the room, we can have a chat about the culture and how it might be different, what they’re finding tricky and how to navigate these new ways of being and relationg.

Realising they are not on their own many times brings peace of mind.

I have to say not all of my clients come in this kind of distress about the language or the new culture. It varies and it depends on where they’re originally from or what issues they bring to therapy.

It might be not related at all to the language, apart from the initial bond of cultural understanding and emotional processing.


Depending on the depth of knowledge of the language, therapists will be confident in working in a second or third language, and clients will be confident in coming to see them.

I’ll give you a personal account of my journey with the English language, and why I feel confident and comfortable working in both languages.

I went to a bilingual school, where the emphasis was more on speaking and writing in English – I can write much better in English than I can in Spanish because of this!

I also went to practice my English in the United States from the age of 9 until 18.

I therefore can speak, write, and connect emotionally in both Spanish and English.

This is why I have been able to work and study and set up my private practice with English and Spanish speaking clients.

It is a great feeling to be able to offer this service, and a relief for companies and clients alike that there is someone like me around for them to talk.

Distance isn’t an issue either as I work online, so people can contact me for sessions from anywhere in the United Kingdom and elsewhere.


In order for me to work in a third language (if I wanted to learn German or move to Germany, for example), there would need to be years of experience and practice, and even then it might be tricky for me to understand a native German’s emotional language in German.

I am of German heritage and “should” really get into my German learning, but I find it so hard to do at this older age. I might try to do it again soon. Who knows!

People have said to me, what if you moved to Germany and worked with German speaking clients?

Well, I could if they spoke to me in English, but then we have the same second-language emotional barriers as above!

Also….Why would a German client see me in a second language (unless they spoke English in the same way I learned it and were emotionally comfortable and confident in both languages!).

I would not be able to do so, I would not be confident or comfortable counselling someone in German, with basic knowledge of the language, and even less knowledge of how they process or talk about emotional stuff in German.

It would be very tricky and take a lot of time!

Add to that my aclimatising to the way things are done in Germany, which I imagine are very different from what I’m now used to in England and even more different than how I remember things from Guatemala.

Interesting experiment though, but not one I’m willing to try right now as I’m quite happy living here in the South of England.

More food for thought….


So, to sum up, therapy in our own language is very important for more than one reason.


Have you found any more reasons that I missed in this post?

Leave me a message and I’ll be happy to update or write a post on your comments and suggestions.


Until next week!


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