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What to expect from Supervision – Boundaries

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As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee * Video: The Meaning of Supervision * Practice to a Safe Standard * Safe Space to Vent


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


Boundaries are a topic dear to my heart.

It’s important in our daily lives, but it takes a different scope when we talk about it in professional terms.


Boundaries in the therapeutic and supervisory realms are key to keeping both relationships safe and doing what they need to do, which is effecting positive and long-lasting change in our clients’ lives.

By supervisors challenging their supervisee’s boundary keeping and setting in the sessions, they are keeping the standards high, as well as teaching the supervisee to stick to the boundaries they know are important but might want to relax due to different dynamics in their relationships with clients.

Don’t get me wrong, we are all human.

Therapists and supervisors are human too.

Our training and personal therapy requirements (ongoing therapy after training feels important, whether you dip in and out or go regularly) raise our self-awareness, but there might always be blind spots that our supervisor might spot easier, looking from the outside.

Keeping to an ethical framework also helps us to keep to boundaries that keep the therapeutic relationship a safe space to work through life’s issues.

Some boundaries might relate to:

  • keeping to the 50-60 minutes and ending sessions on time.
  • keeping communication outside of sessions limited to discussing session times or rescheduling.
  • how much the therapist self-discloses in the counselling sessions.
  • what to do if you are in the same public spaces or find your profiles on social media.
  • how to deal with endings.
  • payment boundaries – before the session, on the day of the session.

What other boundaries do you feel are important in supervision and in the therapeutic space?


watch video for this post - supervision

Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


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What to expect from Supervision – Safe Space to Vent

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee * Video: The Meaning of Supervision * Practice to a Safe Standard


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


Having a safe space to vent is important in more ways than one.

As therapists, we’ve gone through the process of going to regular therapy as part of our course requirements.

If your course didn’t have this as a requirement, and you’re going to practice without having had personal therapy, I urge you to attend.

It is in your personal process that you have the emotional growth and experience of what your clients might feel sitting in the client’s chair.

It is in therapy that we learn about ourselves, our blind spots, and where we start to separate what’s ours from what are actually other people’s beliefs, emotions, thoughts, reactions.

This, in turn helps us when working with our clients, as we will have worked on ourselves and can both be an example and a grounded and safe person to talk to about very difficult things.

Our therapy is our space to vent.

But it’s not the only space to vent we can use in our profession, where we can’t really talk about what goes on in sessions for ethical, moral and confidentiality reasons.

The supervisory relationship is another opportunity to work through our difficult emotions with clients, and even discuss how our current life situations are affecting us and our work.

It is important to be open and honest with ourselves and our supervisor.

This will bring a new dimension of awareness and growth in our practice that will not only benefit us, but it will cross over to how we work with clients, and in turn impact on them too.

I am a firm believer that things communicate even if we never say a word about them (unconscious to unconscious communication in psychodynamic terms).

Our clients will sense whether we have unfinished business to deal with within ourselves, and how we are dealing with it.

Setting an example for our clients might be our first aim in using therapy and supervision as a safe space to vent, but in the long run it will benefit us as practitioners and as human beings.


 

watch video for this post - supervision

Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Practice to a Safe Standard

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee * Video: The Meaning of Supervision


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I want to review some of the ways attending appropriate supervision will help you practice to a high standard.


Every profession has its ethical codes. The medical profession has the Hypocratic Oath (in a few words – do no harm).

The Counselling and Psychotherapy profession also has ethical codes. I follow the BACP’s Ethical Framework, but have also learned more about ethics from courses I’ve gone on and from experience itself.

These codes are set for a reason.

Unfortunately there are people out there that believe they can work as a counsellor or psychotherapist with some basic training and very little supervision.

This is dangerous and should be flagged up and dealt with by Membership Bodies and other organisations involved in regulation and protecting professionals as well as their clients.

Yes, the knowledge we gain through a PgDip or a B.A. course, or the other options out there, is great, but it is certainly not enough.

Good supervision needs to exist from our very first session, and should continue throughout our practice.

It is not just something for trainees (I think in the USA, once you are licenced you don’t need to have supervision regularly anymore, I’m not so sure this is a great idea but they must have things in place for this).

Supervision helps us keep practicing to a safe standard, as it’s a regular space to keep ourselves accountable about the work we do, how we do it, and whether we need a break or are in a good place to continue and work with even more clients with a varity of presentations.

As we’ve spoken about in other posts in this series, good supervision will allow you to develop these areas, which will in turn benefit your practice and your clients and supervisees:

And more…

So, consider your practice as it is now, are you getting these things from your supervision?

Are you practising to a safe-standard?

Being aware of how we work, why we work this way, and how to improve our skillset is all important for your practice and your clients.


 

watch video for this post - supervision

Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

The Meaning of Supervision – Video

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee * Keeping clients safe


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


I hope you are enjoying the Christmas break.

I thought I’d keep it light today – as it’s boxing day in the UK, and I imagine reading a blog post today might not be top on your list of priorities!

Here’s a short video on the meaning of supervision. Enjoy!



Here’s the direct link to the video in my YouTube channel.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Keeping clients safe

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I want to talk about how trusting our supervisor can provide a safe space to challenge our practice.


This post is related to the previous one in that keeping the practitioner safe in supervision ensures that the client is kept safe in their counselling sessions.

Through supervision, we are ensuring that the following points are covered and taken care of (addressed more in depth in other posts in this series):

  • The practitioner is working to a high standard, keeping within professional and ethical boundaries.
  • The practitioner is working to the clients’ best interests.
  • The practising self-care in a way that helps them regroup and refill their emotional bank so they can go back and have more sessions without burning out or feeling overwhelmed with client stuff.
  • The practitioner knows to access personal therapy either regularly or as and when needed.
  • The practitioner is taking down time to spend on their own or with their friends and family to get a balance between work and life.
  • The practitioner is keeping to the therapeutic frame by setting clear boundaries.
  • The practitioner is respecting the clients individuality and autonomy.

 

Do you have other ways in which you keep your clients safe? Leave a comment!


watch video for this post - supervision

Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Focusing on the Supervisee

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I want to talk about how a big part of your supervision time should focus on you – the supervisee.


As therapists, we tend to put our personal feelings, beliefs, thoughts, and other stuff, on the side during the therapy hour.

Our focus is on what the client brings to the session and how we can best help them through what they might be going through.

Being a therapist doesn’t mean we become superhuman or immune to hardship in our personal lives.

It also doesn’t mean that because of our extensive training and expertise, we can easily detach from client material – strong emotions, strong stories…

We need a space to go and process all these things that come up and stay with us for a while after the session is over.

I’m talking about picking up projective identifications, transference, counter transference, and just being human about how our clients’ life circumstances can and will affect us.


There are limited places where we can talk about ourselves in the context of private practice and its impact on us as human beings (personal therapy, supervision).

In supervision, therefore it’s our turn to put ourselves on the forefront and have some time focusing on ourselves and our practice.

It is our turn to be held and contained, to have space to vent, to self-care, to process what went on in our sessions, to reassess and regroup, to work through what’s our stuff and what’s our clients’ stuff, to raise our self-awareness, and more.

Through focusing on the supervisee, in a way we are also focusing on the client.

If the counsellor’s mind and wellbeing is in the right place and being prioritised, then it is more likely that the counsellor can look after their clients’ mental health and wellbeing the best way possible.

It also helps the counsellor to work to a high standard, in a professional and ethical way.

Are you feeling prioritised in supervision? Are you putting yourself first in supervision?


watch video for this post - supervisionFollow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Challenge how you work

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I want to talk about how trusting our supervisor can provide a safe space to challenge our practice.


One of the purposes of supervision is to help us grow as practitioners.

In order to grow, we need to be able to talk about anything and everything that comes up for us in our work with clients and supervisees.

The supervisor needs to be able to challenge the supervisee’s practice in a constructive, non-judgemental manner.

If this is achieved in the supervisory relationship, the supervisee should be able to discuss their fears, doubts and dilemmas without censorship.

This will allow the supervisee to open up and therefore make the most out of supervision, keeping his clients safe, keeping themselves safe and working to a professional and ethical standard.

Supervision can also challenge the supervisee when they feel out of their comfort zone. The supervisor should reassure the supervisee that they don’t have to know anything, and provide support when a new client issue or client presentation arises, and is baffling the supervisee a bit.

I find that sometimes just talking through a particular topic that happened in session with a client will help me gain distance and clarity, and get me back on track to help my client to the best of my ability in the next session.

We are all human even though we might have a better understanding of human behaviour. This doesn’t remove any blind spots we might have, and it’s important to work these out in personal therapy, but also in supervision, as both spaces will deal with the same thing in very different ways.

Exploring ethical dilemmas and testing out new therapeutic techniques are a few other ways a safe and trusting supervisory relationship can be used, to the advantage of both supervisee and their clients.

In what other ways do you use your supervision space? Leave your comments below!


watch video for this post - supervisionFollow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


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