Business Mindset for Private Practitioners


Hi, and welcome to this new series that I’ll be publishing once a month on Mondays.

I have a few reasons for posting this series now.

The first one is that over a year ago, I started supporting private practitioners to get into the marketing mindset, so they can get the clients they want and that need their support.

The second reason is that I’m reading a book called The Business Book, in which I’m learning how to grow my business further, and thought I’d share my learning with everyone.

I’ve also joined an Author Academy that has given me a new tribe to rely on and lots of resources to develop my products and services further.


If you’d like to find out about these, click the affiliate links below:

6-figure Author 5 day challenge

Author: Create 18 streams of income out of your book

Set fire to your business and brand

Become Unhackable


It all starts with an Idea


Do you sit sometimes and think things like:

“I know a lot about this topic, I could offer some services around that”

“Ah that’s a great idea, but how can I get that idea to help others and bring me income in the process?”

“I want to do A, B, C ….. Z, but just thinking of all the work it requires, and all the ideas I have, I’m already overwhelmed”

I have had these thoughts, and some of them have required a mindset change on my part.

Patience and perseverance have also played their part.

I still have many ideas that haven’t come to fruition. I’m working on them.

If you’re like me, you have lots of things to do on the side of your self-employment / entrepreneurial life. Sometimes these things help, other times they make us stop, take stock, regroup and figure out how we’re going to move forward.


Every new idea comes with a risk.

It’s scary to put ourselves out there and either succeed or hear crickets (note I didn’t say fail).

Succeeding is just as scary as hearing crickets or seeing hay bales go across your screen…

According to the authors, we must combine our idea with entrepreneurial spirit.

This basically means that we are willing to take a risk by developing our idea and creating great products and services with it.


Development of a new product or service means we might have to start learning new skills, how to use new tech, do some research on the things already on offer, as well as plan, plan, plan!

This takes time and effort.

If you’ve got life stuff going on – health issues, physical or mental, people to look after, another part time job to help pay the bills – it might mean that it will take longer to develop this idea.

I know I’m struggling with regrouping right now and realising that my time is limited and I need to look after myself.

My priority as ever are my clients – counselling, supervision, tutoring, coaching and content. My energies are invested in them on the days I offer these sessions.

The rest of my time is for admin and rest. Depending on how I’m feeling, rest might take precedent over admin. I might do the bare minimum some weeks.

When we have limited time, but a willingness to support more people than we can in our one-to-one sessions, it feels like everything is urgent.


Prioritise and Be Realistic


The authors propose to have realistic propositions, which includes having an idea and then thinking “finance”.

Now I’ve grown my one-to-one service in a very frugal way. I’ve tried the Facebook Ads and Wordads, but I did those at a time where I didn’t have an audience and it flopped. I might give them a go in the near future, when I have courses and other products on offer and have the capital to spend on them.

Social media is a great way to market yourself for free, and I’ve taken advantage of that possibility. It’s meant that I can put content out there and support the general public and colleagues with great content.

So, the authors suggest we consider whether we need a lot or a little capital, or maybe we don’t need much to start with.

Consider what you need. For example, counsellors might want to pay to be a member of BACP or UKCP, NCS, or any of the others out there. Also being a part of directories will help them get clients. Networking events might cost some money as well.

Start with what you can afford without getting into money worries, and grow your capital for these activities as you grow your business.


If you’re going to the bank to ask for a loan, you’ve got to have a good business plan.

It is easier to get a loan if you’re employed (I know this from personal experience – I got a loan when I was on a 30hr permanent contract, without much fuss…but got denied a loan a couple of years later as I was part employed, part self-employed). Check with your bank what the requirements are if you’re self-employed!

Financial backers will look at your idea and figure out if it’s profitable.

If you don’t require much money to get started, then go for it! If you’ve thought it’s a valuable idea and will benefit others, then why not try it out!


Do something different to stand out – see what’s already out there


Finding out what’s already out there and what will make your products or services different is key.

I say this to people attending my Practical Steps to Blogging Online Workshops:

Nobody knows what you know, how you know it or present it to them. It will be valuable to the people that need to hear your message.

You will already have an edge because of that.

How else can you make yourself stand out?

There is lots of advice out there from business coaches and it can get confusing and daunting as some will say do A B C and others will say definitely don’t do A B C, it doesn’t work!

My best advice on this is, read what they have to say, and do what feels congruent for you.

What works for them might work for you too, or something else might come up that really helps you build your offering reach.

An important thing to develop is the Know, Like, Trust Factor. You can do this in many ways, but the key thing is: (metaphorically) shout that you exist!

For example, if you create an amazing website, but nobody knows about it, you’ll never sell or get clients. You have to guide people to your site to get the business you want.

That is a subject for another post, but promoting yourself is key!


The authors suggest that, once you’ve established yourself and your product or service, it’s time to maintain sales and figure out how you’re going to grow your business in the short and long term.

Don’t allow your business to get stale. Keep innovating, finding new ways to do things.

I’m in the process of starting podcasts, vlogs. It will take time but I’ll get there. I’m pacing myself but I have an idea of where I want to get to.

I am also starting to do workshops online and offering other things like courses (also will take time but I will get there!)

All of this has meant a huge mindset change and re-adjustment.

I’m being kind to myself whilst I readjust and figure out how to do this and grow my business offerings further.


The authors also talk about hiring people.

Now, I got into private practice to work by myself, be my own boss. But I’ve become so busy that I couldn’t do something that I enjoyed any longer, but needed to keep doing in order to keep “top of mind” on social media.

I’ve hired a VA that schedules my social media posts. I have the final say whether I want to change an image or some of the text, but in general she’s doing most of the work. I only spend like 10min (rather than 3hrs) a week on these posts.

It’s freed so much time!


I’m sure she could be doing so much more for me. It’s a mindset change to have someone do stuff for you, so I’m working on that at the moment.

For now I’m happy to keep my social media posts going!


A final note on all I’ve said above.

Self-Care should be key when building and developing your business.

If we don’t look after ourselves, we won’t be able to do any of the work we are dreaming of.

If you want to find out more, I’ve got a very practical book called 20 Self-Care Habits, which comes together with a free Facebook Group, coaching sessions (paid), and in the future some new products and services.


Reference: The Business Book: Sam Atkinson et al. (2014). Big Ideas Simply Explained. Dorling Kindersley Limited, pages 18-19


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


Private Practice Mini Series — Ghosted: the private therapist initiation rite


Hi, and welcome to the third post in my Private Practice mini series aimed at practitioners in private practice, and anyone who works one-to-one with clients.

In the first post of this series, I wrote about creating the mental space that leads clients to find us.

Last week I wrote about calling things into being.


This week I want to talk about those difficult times when we book clients and they either don’t show up, or they have their first session and never contact again.

This is a very tricky situation, that can leave practitioners feeling insecure about their capacity as therapists, or bringing that impostor syndrome to the forefront…or even more, wondering what it is they did that made the client “ghost” them.


I am speaking from personal experience here.


As someone that also had a start in private practice and all that entails, I can say that ghosting happened to me too.

As a supervisor, I really like Scaife’s model (read my post on that here). He talks about responsibility and gives the supervisor, the therapist and the client a set of responsibilities.

I will start with what I’ve experienced as a therapist starting out in private practice and generalise it to other practitioners. Then I will discuss what I think happens from a client’s perspective (some not all possibilities).


In regard to the therapist, I would say that our responsibility is to hold the space for the client, where it’s safe to process and work through difficult stuff.

When we are starting, we are “desperate” (my own words, not calling anyone that although I’m sure some of you reading this can relate) – urged might be a better word, to retain and find clients to fill our time slots and help us start earning an income from what we trained so hard to do.

This urge might communicate over to the client. Unconsciously of course.


I am psychodynamically trained (now working integratively) so I believe that the unconscious to unconscious communications are very powerful.

We might not verbally be saying to the client “please keep me as your therapist, I need you”, but that’s what we might be communicating in many other ways we’re not aware of.

Now, just being aware of this is a great starting point to not put that burden on our clients.

A burden that might lead them to leave.

Apart from this, I don’t think there’s anything else that I can say right now to point the responsibility of a client ghosting a therapist, on the therapist themselves.


Let’s turn to the client’s responsibility.

Sometimes a client books a first session and never shows up.

It might have taken all of their energy and might to contact and book the appointment, but might have realised that they’re not ready yet, or that it’s too scary to attend, or something might have happened that led them to not need therapy anymore.

Sometimes they let us know, other times they don’t. It can be enfuriating, but we can’t take it personally. We might never find out what happened. We might have to live with the “not knowing” of why we were forgotten by our new potential client.


I find that as we spend more time as private practitioners, we get better at setting boundaries and trusting ourselves, and valuing ourselves as practitioners, and this happens less and less.

But when we are beginning, these things might not communicate as much through our contract, or our verbal and non-verbal communications. It’s an art and it’s developed slowly and gently, as we work with more clients and spend more time acclimatising to the realm of private practice.


Other times, a client arrives for their first session, it seems to have gone well, and they never book another session again.

For some clients, the catharsis that happens in a first session might have been enough.

Or it might have been too much to start talking about something that was only in their minds up to the point they started talking about it with their new therapist.

Ideally they’d let us know. But as above, sometimes they don’t.


We must err on the side of trusting our abilities and capacity as qualified and experienced therapists (we have, after all completed quite a few hours in placements before setting up our private practice!), and consider what is our responsibility and what is our clients.

Taking it to supervision and getting reassurance and clarity about what happens when we’re ghosted by clients will build us up, help us set clearer boundaries, possibly rewrite our contracts (I’ve rewritten mine many times, mainly adding stuff as time goes on!) and work on our initial contacts with clients, and how we feel about ourselves as therapists.

I hope this post has been helpful, or at least food for thought. I welcome your feedback and comments.


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


Private Practice Mini Series: Calling things into being by speaking them out.


Hi, and welcome to the second post in my Private Practice mini series aimed at practitioners in private practice, and anyone who works one-to-one with clients.

Last week I spoke about creating the mental space that leads clients to find us.

Next week I want to talk about something that I see happens a lot when we start private practice: clients “ghosting” practitioners.


This week I want to focus on something that I see as “working in the background”, in our favour.

I was chatting to a colleague once and I said something about a plan I had for the next year.

Now taking into account that this colleague didn’t know me for long, what he said marked me.

These are almost his words, verbatim: “yes, I am sure you will achieve that. Everything else you’ve said you’d do, you’ve accomplished so far.”


That got me thinking…


What is it that I’m doing – apart from taking steps towards fulfilling what I’ve said I wanted to do in the first place – that is getting me to achieve that goal?

In having conversations with other people, I started to piece things together and realised a very valuable lesson:

When we call things out….when we name the things we want in life…they will come to us, sooner or later!


Everything we do gets us closer to our goals.

Everything we say gets us closer to our goals.


There is a lot of power in what we say and confess to ourselves and to our friends, family and colleagues!

I really do believe that trusting that what we want to happen will happen is a great way to achieve our goals and live more fulfilling lives.

This is how I’ve been building my practice.

I guess it’s been discussed before in books like The Secret an the Law of Attraction, and such. But until you experience it yourself, it won’t mean much.

This goes hand in hand with what I wrote to you about last week – if we create space and name the things that we want to pass, they will most likely happen.


Another thing I live by is this “what I’m doing now, will help in the future, somehow”.


A clear example is a colleague I’ll be partnering with soon. I met her nearly 7 years ago now at a training session, and she remembered me from that, and now we will be working together!

Yes it’s 7 years later, but the point it, we plant seeds and they grow and flourish when it’s their time to do so.

The key is to plant the seeds, either by doing something, saying something, while taking the steps and planning towards what we want for our lives and businesses.


So get talking, get confessing openly with yourself or with your tribe, those things that are dear to your heart, that will bring your goals to fruition, and your lives to be more fulfilling and more like how you want them to be.

Whether that means having 5 clients, 10 clients, 20 clients…working only 2 days a week…having various sources of income and ways of supporting people with your business…whatever it is…speak up and see it happen!


Until next time…


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


Private Practice Mini-Series: Creating the mental space that leads clients to find us


Hi, and welcome to this mini series aimed at practitioners in private practice, and anyone who works one-to-one with clients.

This will be a three-post series where I’ll be talking about

1. Creating the mental space that leads clients to find us

2. Calling things out so that they become a reality in our lives and businesses

3. Ghosting: a private practitioner’s initiation rite of passage


I’ve been in private practice for nearly 7 years now, and I’ve learned a lot.

Some things I wished I’d learned when I’d started, but that’s not always possible.

It is because of this that I’ve launched some services (free and paid), like this blog, to support practitioners that are just starting out now, to know about things that will get them started with more knowledge than I had when I started.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I like how things have panned out. I love how my practice and life are going. But I know this might not be the case for everyone.

Keep reading if you want to find out about this week’s topic and what I mean by creating mental space.


I’ll write a bit about how I started out and how I got to where I am today.

In 2013, I decided to launch my website and get online on directories so I could get clients. I was also working 37+ hours at a care job (which I enjoyed, but my sights were changing more towards full time private practice, only a dream at this point!).

From that point onward, I had started to lower my hours at that job and spending more time on counselling.

The first two years I didn’t have that many clients. Which was fine because I was renting a room and finding it difficult to find the right times to fit clients anyway.

In 2015 I got a Senior Care Officer contract at a children’s home, which was temporary until November. When that contract finished, it gave me the freedom to work as relief staff, which meant I could choose what days to work and what days to dedicate to my private practice.


This is where it starts to get good!


A month or so before my Senior contract ended, I started thinking more and more about dedicating Mondays and Thursdays to private practice. Just thinking about it did something…

It was almost magic!

By the time my contract ended, I had quite a few more enquiries.

I booked them in, and by the end of the year I’d gone from 1-2 regular clients to 4-8 regular clients!

I got a contract as a support worker in the same children’s home on February 2016, but took only 16hrs per week, which meant I could still dedicate Mondays and Thursdays to counselling and building my business.

My manager there has always been kind enough to accommodate my other responsibilities outside of that job. And as I was working very part time only, it was all good.

That year I did my last waking night shift. That’s how I started letting go of doing extra shifts and focusing more on my private work. By mid 2017 I stopped doing extra shift.


Another dramatic shift came about when I decided to finally give blogging a good chance and take it seriously. This meant taking promoting my blog seriously as well.

And this in turn meant posting regularly and consistently on social media.


I was still counselling Mondays and Thursdays, but decided to start offering sessions on Wednesdays as well.

I got more clients. I also started offering supervision.

I created the mental space for those clients and supervisees, and lo and behold, they contacted and booked!


My last two years at the care job were spent daydreaming about only running my own business.

I planned for it.

I made the mental space for the clients that I needed – a mix of counselling, supervisees, coaching and tutoring clients.

I also started thinking about other services and products to offer.

I wrote 20 Self-Care Habits, which came from a series of blogs I wrote.

I began planning other avenues of income and work.

In July 2019, I left the care job. I miss the social aspects of it and the young people I worked with.

But it wasn’t for me anymore.


I worked 11 years as a support worker in different areas. It gave me lots of knowledge that includes being able to offer counselling to autistic and other neurodiverse people.

My practice is now full to the brim. My products and services are being created slowly but surely.

More books are in the pipeline, as well as collaborations with colleagues and companies to create more mental space to help more clients and colleagues with their lives and careers.


Those who know me will know that I didn’t write this to brag. I’m more in awe of how things are going than anyone else!

I wrote this to show my fellow colleagues what is possible when we work hard, when we get the training, CPD, support from one another, and put ourselves out there.


I hope this post has been helpful to those starting out, and allowed those more seasoned practitioner to reflect on the amazing journey we’re all in…

…doing what we love, whilst at the same time helping our clients and colleagues get back on track, or get their businesses going.

I look forward to writing to you next week.

Until then…


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


Trust your intuition…

Hi, and welcome to this week’s blog post!

I’ve got a few mini-series in mind, and one that’s in progress (Counselling Autistic People), to which I’ll get to in due course.


Today I want to talk about intuition – or what’s also known as our “gut feeling”.


Depending on how we were raised, and the events that we’ve experienced in life, we will be more able to trust our own gut without even thinking twice about it.

Others of us might have more difficulty and need to re-train our minds and bodies to listen to our gut.


As a counsellor/psychotherapist, I’ve been trained to trust my intuition in the therapy room, which generally helps my clients, as what I’m feeling might be a reflection of what’s going on for them.

Call it counter-transference, projective identification, empathy, it all leads back to our gut communication something useful to us.


Trusting our intuition isn’t reserved only for therapists.

It is a tool available for all of us, at one level or another.


So, how do we develop that trust that what is coming up for us, a gut reaction, a “walk away” thought, a “be careful” thought, or goosebumps all over our body, is something we need to listen to, for our own good?

Here are some ways I believe we can develop this important skill:


1 – Start small


Changing our mindsets and the way we do or think or react to things will take time and effort.

Tackling the big things might not be the best idea to start with, as we are not yet able to use our intuition in the best way possible.

Start small…for example: someone asks you for a cup of tea, and your first instinct is “I’m busy, I can’t possibly be making you a cup of tea, this is not the right time for this”.

It might be easier to trust your gut telling you “just say no right now” with something as small as making a cuppa for someone, than it would be something bigger.

The results of saying “No, sorry, I can’t make you that cuppa right now, can you get it yourself please?” will be massive!

You won’t resent your friend/colleague/relative for making you do something you didn’t have time for right now, and you won’t resent yourself for saying no.

Your intuition might have been telling you “if you do this, you’ll resent yourself and them! avoid that resentment and say no.”

I know this sounds trivial but building on this will help you with the bigger things in life.

Maybe you’ll need to trust your gut when driving – Do I go left or right, where is there usually less traffic? which road is safer for me?

Maybe it’s about accepting or rejecting a dinner invitation with someone you know deep inside will make you feel something you don’t want to feel (uncomfortable, judged, belittled, etc).

Why put yourself through things that you clearly don’t want to do and that your instincts are telling you “don’t do it?”


2 – Work it through in Therapy


In therapy, I believe is where we can really put this into practice.

Talking through situations with my clients is something I do on a regular basis.

Going through what happened and seeing things from a different perspective, as well as thinking about what we could’ve done differently in order to get the results we actually wanted…

Sometimes what we could’ve done differently is just listen to our gut…

Developing that keen ear for what we instinctively know is best for us is part of the therapeutic process.

At least when you come see me! Other therapists might work differently.

Listening to our gut is one way where we can learn to meet our own needs, prevent resentment of ourselves or those we love, as well as learning to set clear boundaries that will keep us safe from the things we really don’t want in our lives.


If you want to find out more about this, you can find my book and my facebook group via this link.


Until next week…


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Creating A Supervision Model That Works For Your Practice – Live Event

onlinevent.png


Last week I presented a talk with John Wilson from onlinevents.co.uk, which was all about supervision and how to create a model that works for you.

I spoke about the different theories that underpin my model – I use 5 main ones that  cover everything from contracting, to ethics, to the more personal and relational aspects of supervision.

It was great to see the response, and to have provided some food for thought and, for some of the attendees, some new theories to use within their supervision practice.

Being aware of the theories that can be helpful for supervision and for finding what we need to be getting is also important.

I’ll be talking about the individual aspects I believe should be involved in supervision at different points of the supervisory relationship.

I’ve written about these in my supervision series blog posts which are ready to read now, via the “In Supervision” category. There’s a link below.

What supervision theories underpin your practice?


Here’s a round-up post of all the models I base my supervision framework on.

Have a look at this file for more on what I spoke about in the live event


onlinevent.png

If you missed the free live event, you can catch up here.

It’s an affordable membership and very good CPD throughout the year.

I highly recommend them!


In the last year, I’ve created lots of content that I hope will be informative and interesting, for your practice and the way you approach your supervisory relationship (as a therapist) or your work with supervisees (if you’re a supervisor too!).

I’ll leave links here to the different pages, which can all be found through my main website and main supervision page.


*** VIDEOS ON MY SUPERVISION MODEL AND SUPERVISION POINTS TO KEEP IN MIND ***

IHOLDA~2.PNG

Click here to watch videos of me  explaining my supervision model. 

Click here for videos on supervision points to keep in mind.

Online supervision Videos – how does it work?

You can also follow all of these on Youtube or on the link above.

Click here to read blog posts related to the videos!



Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – personal development

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work * Focusing on the Supervisee

Video: The Meaning of Supervision * Practice to a Safe Standard

Safe Space to Vent * Boundaries

Video: What’s effective supervisionSelf Care

A safe space to process *


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


As therapists, we know that we can (and sometimes might need to) access therapy for our personal development.

Supervision is seen as more of a professional development tool.

I hope that from past posts in this series, you can see the benefit of supervision on your personal development as well.

A brief summary, taking items from the previous posts, on how supervision can help with your personal development:

  • developing self-awarness helps us in the therapy room with clients, but it also allows us to work on our personal relationships. We can learn how to set boundaries and avoid resentments from and towards our loved ones, as well as learning how to meet our needs and not only everyone else’s. This is the self-care aspect of supervision.
  • As humans, we all need to feel contained and held at one point or the other. Practising allowing the supervisor to do this for us in our supervision sessions builds the ability to permit others to help us in our time of distress or need.
  • We might experience tough times in our lives that might require the support of more than one person – our therapist, our supervisor, our friends and family. All of this support will come in handy and help us get back on track and build our resilience to get back into the swing of things.
  • In supervision, the focus is mainly on you as a practitioner. Sometimes we might be introverted or not know how to ask for help or even be comfortable with the spotlight shining on us. The fact that supervision is a space where we talk about ourselves and ourselves with our clients is a great way to “normalise” the fact that we are also allowed in the spotlight at times.
  • We all have things we need to vent or get out of our systems. If we can’t do it in our supervision space, then we might need to reconsider our supervision arrangements!
  • Processing client material or situations in our work life is something to work on in Supervision. Sometimes the focus is on the clients, other times it’s on aspects of our work or life that need to be worked through in order to keep on top of things and be great practitioners.

Fancy watching a video intro to this post instead?

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – A safe space to process

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work * Focusing on the Supervisee

Video: The Meaning of Supervision * Practice to a Safe Standard

Safe Space to Vent * Boundaries

Video: What’s effective supervisionSelf Care


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


There is something that happens in the therapy room that is replayed in the supervision room.

It’s called parallel process.

Of course, it doesn’t happen in the exact same way, but the general idea is the same.

Therapists are human too, and as such, we sometimes get overwhelmed by others’ stories.

If we get overwhelmed, surely we need to get support to work through the stuff that is causing us distress.

This is why the supervision space is so important!

We need to feel safe in order to talk about very deep stuff that might have been brought up by one or two of our clients.

It is important to do this, so we can continue to work with our clients and provide them with the support they need, without colluding or feeling stuck or unable to help them.

Processing emotions as they arise is key to keeping on top of the situations in the sessions, and it helps regroup and regain the strength and perspective to work with a particualar client or clients.

I find that working through issues in supervision renews my strength and gives me a new perspective of why I might have felt a certain way after a particular client session.

Figuring out what’s my stuff is also helpful, and I can then work through that and separate it from my client and the work we are doing in their sessions.

Do you feel safe to talk about these things in your supervisory relationship?



Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Self-Care

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice 

Autonomous Practice * Theoretical Grounding

 Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee

 * Video: The Meaning of Supervision * Practice to a Safe Standard

Safe Space to Vent * Boundaries *

Video: What’s effective supervision?


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I’d like to talk about how supervision can be a space for self-care.

If you would rather watch a video about this topic, please scroll down to watch.


I usually address the self-care topic from a personal perspective, as you can find in my book 20 Self-Care Habits.

Therapists are also human.

We need to remember that when we go to our own therapy or when sitting opposite our clients as their therapists.

In that respect, we need to acknowledge our humanity and therefore what we need in order to be able to best support our clients through their own process.

To aide in this, I believe supervision should be a space for reflection.

To reflect on who we are as practitioners.

Who we are in our relationships with each client.

To reflect on the work we do, how we do it. Is it good enough?

Book Cover

Is there anything new we need to learn to help a particular client?

Are we up to date on our professional development?

What do we need from our supervisor and from ourselves?

From this, we can expect to develop our self-awareness and understand ourselves, who we are and how we practice better.

This will improve our practice and our relationships with our clients and with ourselves.

Being reflective in supervision, being self-aware and self-understanding will allow us to understand the need for keeping boundaries in order to keep the therapeutic relationship and ourselves as therapists safe.

When we reflect on how we use our time, we will find the ability to just stop and be.

If we are telling our clients to do that, it will be a great modelling tool if we have already learned to do this ourselves.

Supervision should allow you to just be, to reflect and to develop yourself as a practitioner through self-awareness and understanding.


Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients



Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – What’s effective supervision

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee * Video: The Meaning of Supervision * Practice to a Safe Standard * Safe Space to Vent * Boundaries


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


I hope you enjoy this short video that encapsulates some of what I believe is effective supervision.

For more, you can catch up on my past posts by clicking each of the links above.


 


Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Boundaries

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee * Video: The Meaning of Supervision * Practice to a Safe Standard * Safe Space to Vent


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


Boundaries are a topic dear to my heart.

It’s important in our daily lives, but it takes a different scope when we talk about it in professional terms.


Boundaries in the therapeutic and supervisory realms are key to keeping both relationships safe and doing what they need to do, which is effecting positive and long-lasting change in our clients’ lives.

By supervisors challenging their supervisee’s boundary keeping and setting in the sessions, they are keeping the standards high, as well as teaching the supervisee to stick to the boundaries they know are important but might want to relax due to different dynamics in their relationships with clients.

Don’t get me wrong, we are all human.

Therapists and supervisors are human too.

Our training and personal therapy requirements (ongoing therapy after training feels important, whether you dip in and out or go regularly) raise our self-awareness, but there might always be blind spots that our supervisor might spot easier, looking from the outside.

Keeping to an ethical framework also helps us to keep to boundaries that keep the therapeutic relationship a safe space to work through life’s issues.

Some boundaries might relate to:

  • keeping to the 50-60 minutes and ending sessions on time.
  • keeping communication outside of sessions limited to discussing session times or rescheduling.
  • how much the therapist self-discloses in the counselling sessions.
  • what to do if you are in the same public spaces or find your profiles on social media.
  • how to deal with endings.
  • payment boundaries – before the session, on the day of the session.

What other boundaries do you feel are important in supervision and in the therapeutic space?


watch video for this post - supervision

Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Safe Space to Vent

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee * Video: The Meaning of Supervision * Practice to a Safe Standard


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


Having a safe space to vent is important in more ways than one.

As therapists, we’ve gone through the process of going to regular therapy as part of our course requirements.

If your course didn’t have this as a requirement, and you’re going to practice without having had personal therapy, I urge you to attend.

It is in your personal process that you have the emotional growth and experience of what your clients might feel sitting in the client’s chair.

It is in therapy that we learn about ourselves, our blind spots, and where we start to separate what’s ours from what are actually other people’s beliefs, emotions, thoughts, reactions.

This, in turn helps us when working with our clients, as we will have worked on ourselves and can both be an example and a grounded and safe person to talk to about very difficult things.

Our therapy is our space to vent.

But it’s not the only space to vent we can use in our profession, where we can’t really talk about what goes on in sessions for ethical, moral and confidentiality reasons.

The supervisory relationship is another opportunity to work through our difficult emotions with clients, and even discuss how our current life situations are affecting us and our work.

It is important to be open and honest with ourselves and our supervisor.

This will bring a new dimension of awareness and growth in our practice that will not only benefit us, but it will cross over to how we work with clients, and in turn impact on them too.

I am a firm believer that things communicate even if we never say a word about them (unconscious to unconscious communication in psychodynamic terms).

Our clients will sense whether we have unfinished business to deal with within ourselves, and how we are dealing with it.

Setting an example for our clients might be our first aim in using therapy and supervision as a safe space to vent, but in the long run it will benefit us as practitioners and as human beings.


 

watch video for this post - supervision

Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Practice to a Safe Standard

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee * Video: The Meaning of Supervision


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I want to review some of the ways attending appropriate supervision will help you practice to a high standard.


Every profession has its ethical codes. The medical profession has the Hypocratic Oath (in a few words – do no harm).

The Counselling and Psychotherapy profession also has ethical codes. I follow the BACP’s Ethical Framework, but have also learned more about ethics from courses I’ve gone on and from experience itself.

These codes are set for a reason.

Unfortunately there are people out there that believe they can work as a counsellor or psychotherapist with some basic training and very little supervision.

This is dangerous and should be flagged up and dealt with by Membership Bodies and other organisations involved in regulation and protecting professionals as well as their clients.

Yes, the knowledge we gain through a PgDip or a B.A. course, or the other options out there, is great, but it is certainly not enough.

Good supervision needs to exist from our very first session, and should continue throughout our practice.

It is not just something for trainees (I think in the USA, once you are licenced you don’t need to have supervision regularly anymore, I’m not so sure this is a great idea but they must have things in place for this).

Supervision helps us keep practicing to a safe standard, as it’s a regular space to keep ourselves accountable about the work we do, how we do it, and whether we need a break or are in a good place to continue and work with even more clients with a varity of presentations.

As we’ve spoken about in other posts in this series, good supervision will allow you to develop these areas, which will in turn benefit your practice and your clients and supervisees:

And more…

So, consider your practice as it is now, are you getting these things from your supervision?

Are you practising to a safe-standard?

Being aware of how we work, why we work this way, and how to improve our skillset is all important for your practice and your clients.


 

watch video for this post - supervision

Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

The Meaning of Supervision – Video

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee * Keeping clients safe


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


I hope you are enjoying the Christmas break.

I thought I’d keep it light today – as it’s boxing day in the UK, and I imagine reading a blog post today might not be top on your list of priorities!

Here’s a short video on the meaning of supervision. Enjoy!



Here’s the direct link to the video in my YouTube channel.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Keeping clients safe

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work *Focusing on the Supervisee


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I want to talk about how trusting our supervisor can provide a safe space to challenge our practice.


This post is related to the previous one in that keeping the practitioner safe in supervision ensures that the client is kept safe in their counselling sessions.

Through supervision, we are ensuring that the following points are covered and taken care of (addressed more in depth in other posts in this series):

  • The practitioner is working to a high standard, keeping within professional and ethical boundaries.
  • The practitioner is working to the clients’ best interests.
  • The practising self-care in a way that helps them regroup and refill their emotional bank so they can go back and have more sessions without burning out or feeling overwhelmed with client stuff.
  • The practitioner knows to access personal therapy either regularly or as and when needed.
  • The practitioner is taking down time to spend on their own or with their friends and family to get a balance between work and life.
  • The practitioner is keeping to the therapeutic frame by setting clear boundaries.
  • The practitioner is respecting the clients individuality and autonomy.

 

Do you have other ways in which you keep your clients safe? Leave a comment!


watch video for this post - supervision

Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Focusing on the Supervisee

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times

Challenge how you work


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I want to talk about how a big part of your supervision time should focus on you – the supervisee.


As therapists, we tend to put our personal feelings, beliefs, thoughts, and other stuff, on the side during the therapy hour.

Our focus is on what the client brings to the session and how we can best help them through what they might be going through.

Being a therapist doesn’t mean we become superhuman or immune to hardship in our personal lives.

It also doesn’t mean that because of our extensive training and expertise, we can easily detach from client material – strong emotions, strong stories…

We need a space to go and process all these things that come up and stay with us for a while after the session is over.

I’m talking about picking up projective identifications, transference, counter transference, and just being human about how our clients’ life circumstances can and will affect us.


There are limited places where we can talk about ourselves in the context of private practice and its impact on us as human beings (personal therapy, supervision).

In supervision, therefore it’s our turn to put ourselves on the forefront and have some time focusing on ourselves and our practice.

It is our turn to be held and contained, to have space to vent, to self-care, to process what went on in our sessions, to reassess and regroup, to work through what’s our stuff and what’s our clients’ stuff, to raise our self-awareness, and more.

Through focusing on the supervisee, in a way we are also focusing on the client.

If the counsellor’s mind and wellbeing is in the right place and being prioritised, then it is more likely that the counsellor can look after their clients’ mental health and wellbeing the best way possible.

It also helps the counsellor to work to a high standard, in a professional and ethical way.

Are you feeling prioritised in supervision? Are you putting yourself first in supervision?


watch video for this post - supervisionFollow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Challenge how you work

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I want to talk about how trusting our supervisor can provide a safe space to challenge our practice.


One of the purposes of supervision is to help us grow as practitioners.

In order to grow, we need to be able to talk about anything and everything that comes up for us in our work with clients and supervisees.

The supervisor needs to be able to challenge the supervisee’s practice in a constructive, non-judgemental manner.

If this is achieved in the supervisory relationship, the supervisee should be able to discuss their fears, doubts and dilemmas without censorship.

This will allow the supervisee to open up and therefore make the most out of supervision, keeping his clients safe, keeping themselves safe and working to a professional and ethical standard.

Supervision can also challenge the supervisee when they feel out of their comfort zone. The supervisor should reassure the supervisee that they don’t have to know anything, and provide support when a new client issue or client presentation arises, and is baffling the supervisee a bit.

I find that sometimes just talking through a particular topic that happened in session with a client will help me gain distance and clarity, and get me back on track to help my client to the best of my ability in the next session.

We are all human even though we might have a better understanding of human behaviour. This doesn’t remove any blind spots we might have, and it’s important to work these out in personal therapy, but also in supervision, as both spaces will deal with the same thing in very different ways.

Exploring ethical dilemmas and testing out new therapeutic techniques are a few other ways a safe and trusting supervisory relationship can be used, to the advantage of both supervisee and their clients.

In what other ways do you use your supervision space? Leave your comments below!


watch video for this post - supervisionFollow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.


new supervision blog post banner

What to expect from Supervision – Working through tough times

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding

Reflective Practice

Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding

Develop Self-Awareness


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I want to talk about how supervision can help us work through difficult times.

As therapists, we deal with very strong emotions when in session with our clients.
It’s important we have a safe space to talk about these things and manage the effects of sessions on us.

Sometimes we might just need clarification or understanding our reactions better and what is going on in the therapeutic relationship.

This is what the supervision space is mainly used for.

But it isn’t the only emotional stuff that can be worked through.

It is in supervision where we can also debrief about personal stuff that might be affecting us and possibly impacting on our work (Personal therapy is advisable for ongoing work on these arising issues).

Therapists are human too and allowing ourselves to own our emotions and reactions with the support of our supervisor will help us regroup and therefore help our clients better.


Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

What to expect from Supervision – Develop Self-Awareness

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding

Reflective Practice

Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.

 

 


In this post, I want to talk about how you can develop self-awareness in supervision.


As you might or might not have noticed, this was meant to be last week’s post, but instead of apologising I am going to say that I am going to use it to the advantage of this post’s topic: self-awareness.

Because i’m so aware of my present physical health issues, I know that one or two weeks of the month my energy levels are low and therefore I need to “lower expectations” of myself and what I can achieve (I am getting this sorted, but it takes time to get everything done, in the meantime this is the plan!). 

This self-awareness allows me to be honest with myself and lower expectations – some things are just going to have to wait. I prioritise my work with my clients and my students and rest in between sessions so I have energy to see them. I sometimes need to cancel a session or two if it gets really bad. 

This just means I’m human, I’m aware of my limitations when exhaustion hits, and I keep myself and my clients and students safe by letting them know what’s going on. 

My supervisor is aware of these issues and checks in every week (we meet for 30min every week) and we discuss what it was like to work like this, what it feels like to be struggling and still needing to work, the positive impact of helping my counselling clients, supervisees and teaching my students, has on my health (I do feel much better after each session! I love what I do!)

Self awareness is key. If I didn’t have this, I would probably continue scheduling all my social media posts (I spend at least 3-4 hours a week doing this!) and writing all the blog posts I have scheduled myself to write and publish every week, and so on. I haven’t done that this week as it would mean a headache and making myself more exhausted. 

I am writing this today because I’m feeling a tiny bit better, and am making time for a meeting.

Anyway, enough of me, my ailments and working practices!

(I do hope it was even a slight bit helpful, an insight into the real life of a therapist and supervisor. We are human too and we shouldn’t shy away from being open and honest – to a degree of course – about these things, note you still don’t know what my ailments are and it’s not necessary for you to know, in order to empathise or understand where I’m coming from!)


Here are a few things that will improve in your practice and your relationship with your clients and your supervisor when you allow self-awareness to develop in every step of your work:

  • when we are open and honest with ourselves and speak openly and honestly with our supervisor, we are allowing ourselves to
    • understand ourselves better
    • decide how we want to run our practice
    • what is acceptable for us and what isn’t
    • what makes us happy
    • what upsets us
    • what boundaries we need to tighten or put into place
    • what are our strengths and weaknesses
    • what areas we need to develop or improve so our interventions are more varied and helpful
    • what we need to study a bit more through reading or CPD
    • what happens when we are faced with difference or similarities between us and clients
    • choosing a niche
      • what clients we can see and which ones we choose not to (we are human, we might not like to work with a particular group and enjoy working with another)

5Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

What to expect from Supervision – Developing self-awareness

I am a bit delayed with today’s supervision blog post.

This week I want to write about the importance of self-awareness.

I will publish the blog post tomorrow.

I’m taking some self-care time off today – I really need it!

In the meantime here is a video introducing the topic.

Enjoy!

developing self-awareness in supervision

%d bloggers like this: