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What to expect from Supervision – Challenge how you work

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As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding Reflective Practice  * Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding * Develop Self-Awareness * Working through tough times


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I want to talk about how trusting our supervisor can provide a safe space to challenge our practice.


One of the purposes of supervision is to help us grow as practitioners.

In order to grow, we need to be able to talk about anything and everything that comes up for us in our work with clients and supervisees.

The supervisor needs to be able to challenge the supervisee’s practice in a constructive, non-judgemental manner.

If this is achieved in the supervisory relationship, the supervisee should be able to discuss their fears, doubts and dilemmas without censorship.

This will allow the supervisee to open up and therefore make the most out of supervision, keeping his clients safe, keeping themselves safe and working to a professional and ethical standard.

Supervision can also challenge the supervisee when they feel out of their comfort zone. The supervisor should reassure the supervisee that they don’t have to know anything, and provide support when a new client issue or client presentation arises, and is baffling the supervisee a bit.

I find that sometimes just talking through a particular topic that happened in session with a client will help me gain distance and clarity, and get me back on track to help my client to the best of my ability in the next session.

We are all human even though we might have a better understanding of human behaviour. This doesn’t remove any blind spots we might have, and it’s important to work these out in personal therapy, but also in supervision, as both spaces will deal with the same thing in very different ways.

Exploring ethical dilemmas and testing out new therapeutic techniques are a few other ways a safe and trusting supervisory relationship can be used, to the advantage of both supervisee and their clients.

In what other ways do you use your supervision space? Leave your comments below!


watch video for this post - supervisionFollow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,391 other followers


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What to expect from Supervision – Working through tough times

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding

Reflective Practice

Autonomous Practice

Theoretical Grounding

Develop Self-Awareness


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.


In this post, I want to talk about how supervision can help us work through difficult times.

As therapists, we deal with very strong emotions when in session with our clients.
It’s important we have a safe space to talk about these things and manage the effects of sessions on us.

Sometimes we might just need clarification or understanding our reactions better and what is going on in the therapeutic relationship.

This is what the supervision space is mainly used for.

But it isn’t the only emotional stuff that can be worked through.

It is in supervision where we can also debrief about personal stuff that might be affecting us and possibly impacting on our work (Personal therapy is advisable for ongoing work on these arising issues).

Therapists are human too and allowing ourselves to own our emotions and reactions with the support of our supervisor will help us regroup and therefore help our clients better.


Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,391 other followers

What to Expect From Supervision – Theoretical Grounding

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here:

Containment and Holding

Reflective Practice

Autonomous Practice


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.

 

 

 


In this post, I want to talk about the importance of having a supervisor with a sound theoretical grounding.

Supervisors should have a sound theoretical grounding when providing supervision services.

What this means might vary from professional to professional, but gaining knowledge is important by any means (courses, reading books, cpd…)


I completed my diploma in supervision in 2015, and it gave me lots of food for thought, but most importantly it gave me the theoretical knowledge, skills and grounding from which to work with my supervisees.

1

I developed a model of working that I feel covers all the areas – practical such as contracting, psychological such as providing a safe space to work through clinical work, ethical and boundary issues, and more.

I don’t think I would be as confident in supervising practitioners if I didn’t have this base knowledge.

Don’t get me wrong, I believe that it is possible to work without having gone through a supervision course, but I am a firm believer in having knowledge behind me to be able to offer the best service to my supervisees, which will in turn impact on the clients they see.


Learning theory is important in practice because it allows us to get a good perspective of the work we do and all the areas that we need to pay attention to in order to do our work well, within ethical boundaries, and to a high standard.


Here are a few things your supervisor should know when working with you:

  • awareness of all the areas involved in client work
    • relationship between the client and the therapist
    • relationship between supervisor and therapist
    • the parallel process between therapy and supervision sessions
    • the client’s life context 3
    • the supervisee’s work context
    • the responsibilities and roles of each party involved – client, therapist, supervisor
  • awareness of the stage of development of the supervisee, so the supervisor can provide appropriate support at that particular level and adjust as the supervisee moves from trainee to autonomous
  • have clear systems and boundaries around the supervisory relationship in itself, including
    • contracting and reviewing
    • dealing with issues as they arise
    • providing a safe space for the supervisee to be challenged and to reflect, within ethical and professional boundaries
  • provide support in these areas
    • practical and educational
    • emotional, psychological
    • ethical and professional

4Here are a few things that you will gain from supervision when your supervisor has a sound theoretical grounding:

  • space to review theoretical concepts learned and how to put them into practice
  • develop your own way of working within your chosen theoretical modality, with an opportunity to add skills from other modalities to your toolkit
  • to learn how to communicate better in regards to issues arising in the sessions with clients, but also in supervision sessions
  • it will also improve your professional skills,
  • and more…

All of these are important for your private practice.

Are you getting these from your current supervision arrangements? 


5Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients

 


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Join 4,391 other followers

 

What to expect from supervision – Autonomous Practice

new supervision blog post banner


As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.


Missed my previous posts?

Catch up here: Containment and Holding, and Reflective Practice


I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients.


Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Click here to visit my main supervision page.

Are you starting out in private practice?

Are you an experienced therapist looking for a new supervisory relationship?

To book supervision with me, do get in touch and I’ll be happy to set up an initial meeting.

 


In this post, I want to talk about developing an autonomous practice as therapists gain more experience, and how this evolves in the supervision setting.


1Do you remember – or are you there now – the first few client sessions, and how terrifying it felt? Am sure your first sessions went better than you remember or expected them to go.

It is not unusual to get “impostor syndrome” – that feeling that we are doing a job that we are really not qualified to do; or we feel we are not good enough to be helping someone with their deepest, darkest, most difficult struggles.

But the fact is, we have worked hard in getting the training we need to be able to do this job we call therapy. So we are not impostors, we are well equipped to do the job.


Supervision is a place where we can build this confidence, and move away from feeling like an “impostor” to feeling confident and capable of helping people in their time of distress.

When we first start off in our placements, we need a lot of support from our supervisor.

2We might be focusing in sessions on how to keep ourselves grounded, even in light of very distressing emotions and conversations. This might take all our energy at first.

Our supervisor’s job here will be to contain and hold us, helping us think about what is going on for us in sessions, and guiding us in what might be the best intervention for this particular client.

In due course, we will start to “let go” of our supervisors hand a bit more, trusting ourselves more and more as we see more clients and get more experience.

Slowly, we are becoming more confident and secure in who we are becoming as therapists. Developing our own identity as professionals.

We don’t need our supervisor to tell us what interventions to use or when.

We might now need to start thinking more about why we chose certain interventions and what effect this has had in the therapeutic relationship and the client.

3

Reflective practice deepens and autonomy is emerging.

The supervisory relationship must change accordingly in order for autonomy to further develop.


Move forward a few years, you are now in private practice.

What you need now looks very different to what you needed during those first sessions.

A more collegiate, collaborative relationship forms with your supervisor.


You might need a new supervisor to break that link from trainee to fully qualified, or your supervisor might just get it and you stay with them (I speak from experience!)


A more collegiate relationship means that your supervisor is in a position to still contain and hold when needed, but will most likely challenge you a bit more in regards to critical thinking and reflecting about your work, how you are keeping yourself up to date with CPD and other training, as well as how you are keeping safe in regards to ethics and professional boundaries with clients.

4Of course, all of these should also happen when we start in placement, but these become more obvious as we let go of depending 90-100% on our supervisor for support with interventions and the basics, to depending more on our knowledge and experience and using the supervision space for more in-depth work.

Autonomy develops further when we feel confident in our work but still rely on an objective observer’s – our supervisor’s – outlook on what we are communicating about our client sessions and what this brings up in us.

We are still human, we still “miss” the nuances due to being “in” the therapeutic relationship with our client, and the keen eye of a supervisor is great for clearing up blind spots or clarifying aspects of the relationship with the client that will help us as therapists and therefore help our clients.


5Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients!


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,391 other followers

What to expect from supervision – Containment and Holding

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As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.

I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients.


In this post, I want to talk about Containment and Holding in the supervision setting.


Disclaimer!


1


Containment and Holding are usually linked more to the therapy process. In this context, it means that the therapist is there to support the client through difficult emotions, feelings and situations.

Staying calm, strong and professional amongst their client’s storm is key for the therapist, as this will help the client explore his/her issues without worrying about falling apart — the therapist is there to help.

The way the therapist helps might vary – the therapist might fill in gaps by providing information about how they feel when the client tells their story, or ask questions about how the client feels in that moment (it all depends on the therapist’s modality); or the therapist might allow some silence to process the things that are coming up for their client.

Another way might be the therapist, who might see the problem more clearly as an outsider to it, is able to provide deeper understanding of the situation for the client, allowing space to process and develop a new way of thinking about it all. This takes time of course.

In a similar way, the therapist will need containment and holding in their supervision session.

Why is that?


2


Dealing with strong emotions and difficult situations that our clients bring, can take it’s toll or at least have a small impact on the therapist’s life.

Therefore, the therapist needs a safe space to go through a smilar “parallel” process, to regroup, re-energise and gain some further perspective on what happened in the session, what went on for the client and what went on for the therapist themselves.

This is important as it will help pin-point “blind spots” in the relationship with this client, or simply allow for space to process their own emotions and thoughts about this client, which leads to the therapist being able to better help the client in the next session.

Supervision is so important in this respect.

I find that sharing the emotional and psychological load is sometimes enough, especially after a particularly difficult session.

I find that when my supervisor listens to me, I feel contained and held by them, and able to have “a moment” while I regroup and while we work together into making sense of what went on for everyone in the session.

This “moment” remains in the supervision session, but it is important to process it in order to be able to be present, calm, strong and professional with our clients in their time of need.


3


Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients!


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,391 other followers

What to expect from supervision – space for reflective practice

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As therapists, it is vital that we have a good support system in place for our professional and confidential work.

Personal therapy is one way in which we can get this support. Supervision is another, and it will be the focus of these posts.

In the next few months, I will talk a bit about 18 ways in which we should expect supervision to work for us.

1

I will discuss 18 things we should expect from our supervisory relationship in order to be accountable and working to a professional standard, for the sake of our practice, our profession, and most importantly, for the sake of our clients.


 

In this post, I want to talk about Reflective practice.


Gibbs reflective cycle theory is a great theory to break down your thinking and reflecting process down into manageable steps.

Your supervisor should be able to help you with this.

 


2

Here are the steps and how to make the most out of each one


  1. How did the situation make you feel?
    • Reflecting on what emotions the situation with your client brought up for you is important to process and work through them, so you can continue working and offering your client the best therapy service possible.
  2. What did the situation make you think about?
    • Reflecting on the situation with your client will also allow you to think about future situations and how you will handle them if anything similar were to arise again.
    • 3It might also make you think about gaps in knowledge which you can remedy by reading, or attending webinars or seminars on the topic.
  3. Can you see the positives among the negatives?
    • Every situation has positives, and hopefully this one does as well. Weighing the positives amongst the negatives will allow you to grow through the difficulties that present themselves when working as a therapist, and will therefore help you build resilience and confidence with a wider variety of issues.
  4. Reflect on what you got out of the three steps above: are things clearer now?
        • What can you see now that wasn’t obvious before you processed your thoughts and feelings on the situation and your client?4

       

    1. is there anything you could have done differently?
      • this is a “devil’s advocate” question that sometimes grates on me. So if it grated on you, you’re in good company!
      • Sometimes there is absolutely nothing we could have done differently.
      • But at the time what we did might not be the worst thing we could have done. It is what we had available to do at the time, and it was good enough, especially if it didn’t harm the client or the relationship in any way.
      • You can always go back and talk to the client about what happened, and try offering a solution the next time around. The great thing about therapy is we don’t have to have all the solutions, both you and your client need to dig deep into the client’s resources and find them together.
    2. what else could you have done?5
      • Hopefully from your reflections, you can now confidently answer this question, and you are taking steps to fill any gaps in knowledge that might have become aparent. You don’t have to know everything, nobody does!
    3. what will you do next time?
      • Lots of tools and skills should have been developed or at least you would have been made aware of how to use them for the next session with this client and for future sessions with other clients.

 

 


6

Follow this link for a video describing this process.

Feel free to share it with your colleagues, supervisees, supervisors and others.


The more we talk about what supervision should be about, what it should cover, and how it should support therapists in their private practice, the better equipped we all will be, and we will provide the a better service to our clients!


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4,391 other followers

5 more ways in which supervision is important (videos)

#supervisionwithkarin (2)


Dear readers,

This week is week 3 of #supervisionwithkarin month.

Am really enjoying the interactions over at Twitter, InstagramLinkedInFacebookYoutube and Pinterest.

Come and join in the conversation! 


In this week’s post, I’d like to leave you with 5 more Storyboard Videos about reasons why supervision is important for those in Private Practice.

The following videos refer to the following isues that can be developed and worked on in Supervision:

  1. Supervision is important for your professional development and the growth of your practice, but it is also helpful – alongside personal therapy – for personal development.
  2. Supervision helps us work to a safe standard by keeping us accountable and working within an ethial framwork.
  3. Reflective practice is important – learning from our successes but also from our mistakes or missed opportunities helps us grow as practitioners and therefore help our clients more effectively.
  4. The supervisor’s role is to challenge their supervisees in a way that supports rather than hinders their self-confidence and ability to work with their clients, and to talk to their supervisor without censoring themselves.
  5. Similarly to point number 1, supervision is a safe space to process personal feelings and thoughts that might have been brought up by client sessions.

For more information on supervision with me – face to face and online – visit my Supervision Pages here.



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