Blog Post Showcase: Angela Tulloch: Grief and Loss Poetry Part 2


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In Today’s post, Angela speaks to us about Grief, make sure you read part 1, in which Angela gave us a beautiful poem she wrote.

Part 3 will be out on Monday 13th July, which will be another few beautiful poems.


Grief and loss


Grief is something that we all will experience at some point in our life. 

Grief does not discriminate, and sometimes takes us unawares.

Some common symptoms to loss may include:

  • Shock and numbness, overwhelming sadness, crying, tiredness or exhaustion. 
  • You might express anger towards the person you have lost or the reason for your loss.
  • You might feel guilty about feeling angry, guilty about something you might have said during a disagreement, or not said, or not been able to stop your loved one from dying. 
  • You might have not been present when your loved one died.
  • You might feel guilty for not feeling anything at all. You might feel guilty for not crying or being sad.

These feelings may not be there all the time and may come in waves unexpectedly.



How do I grieve my loved ones?

There is no right or wrong way to grieve a loss.  We all cope differently.  How you grieve will depend on your personality, your faith, life experiences and how significant the loss was to you.  There is no time limit placed on grief.


Is there a time limit on how long I should grieve?


Healing from grief will take place over time, but it is a process that should not be rushed.  There is no time limit or fixed end when one should stop feeling the pain. 

 There may be days when you feel better and then a sudden memory is triggered by something someone said, a song, a smell or a visit to a memorable place, or you might just be deep in your thoughts.

Take grief at your own pace, be patient and don’t rush, everyone is different. 

 For some people it may be weeks or months, for others it is years. Sometimes you might feel guilty for not grieving your loss for the period expected by others. Sometimes you might feel guilty for feeling a little happier than the day before.

People may say words or comment, some might be unexpected or even hurt.  Things like;



Be strong


The loss of a loved one is an emotional time of deep pain. It often brings reflection of how things could have been. The plan of retirement or grandchildren, of a future together. What you are feeling is normal. You do not need to pretend or keep in your emotions.  Being able to show your true feelings will help you to cope better.



You have not cried since the death?


This does not mean you do not feel the pain deep inside, that keeps you awake late at night.  Yes, crying is a normal response to sadness, but it is not the only way to express sadness.



Are you still grieving after all these years?


There is no specific time on how long one should grieve.  How long it takes will depend on each person. There is a healing process taking place.


It has not been that long, and he is moved on already?


This is often difficult for those left behind, and you might feel guilty.  Moving on does not mean you have forgotten the person you love.  The memories will always be there but may not be as frequent.  There will always be an empty space in your life, but you will have learned ways to cope.  You have come to a place of acceptance, and able to build a life around your loss.

By Angela Tulloch

References: HelpGuide.org 


I’ll be updating these posts as I receive links to colleague’s blog posts. Keep an eye out for these!

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Thought of the Day: Creativity and Therapy Work


Creativity is something that we might take for granted in our busy lives.

There is something powerful in stopping and considering doing creative work in one way or another.

This could be writing a poem, a short story, colouring, drawing, painting, or just taking in the impressive world of nature.

All of these things help shift things inside of us.

They help us reflect, renew our minds and souls, revisit things with a new perspective.

They help us move forward with life in a way we might not have thought about before.


Creativity comes in many forms, and so does self-discovery.

Working with a counsellor in the therapy room will allow you to work on the things I mentioned above, in a non-judgemental, safe space where you can say anything without fear.

This will help you explore further those things that might have you stuck, overwhelmed, or simply wondering.


Have you tried counselling before?

If so, what’s been helpful.

If you haven’t, what’s stopping you?

Remember, you’ll be ready to work on yourself creatively in therapy or otherwise, when the time is right.

Everyone’s timing is different.


Read A Creative Space to Grow from…The Therapeutic Relationship.


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Blog Post Showcase: Angela Tulloch: Grief and Loss Poetry


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In Today’s post, Angela speaks to us about Grief in the form of a poem. There are two more blogs to come after this one, so keep an eye out and make sure to subscribe so you don’t miss them. They’re really good!


Grief and loss

The journey without an end.


Is what I’m feeling normal?


This emotional suffering I am feeling is overwhelming. 

 I am told it is a natural response to loss. 

My emotions come and go, like waves on a rough sea.   

Sometimes together, sometimes on their own. 

Shock, anger, disbelief, guilt, and profound sadness.

They appear suddenly.

Sometimes they stay awhile.

I struggle to get the thoughts out of my head.


They say it is a normal reaction to loss.


 My health and sleep are often disturbed.

 Sometimes I struggle to fall asleep

And struggle to get out of bed.

My appetite is not what it used to be.


They say it is a normal reaction to loss.


I do not know how I am really supposed to feel,

but it does not feel normal to me. 

I have lost that sparkle,

I do not smile or laugh anymore,

and people are noticing. 


They say it is a normal reaction to loss.


I sometimes lose my patience over the smallest of things,

and rather be on my own. 

My body feels weak, my head like it does not belong.

I want to scream, but I dare not in case I cannot stop. 


They say it is a normal reaction to loss.


I noticed couples, I noticed mothers and fathers,

Sisters and brothers, children, babies and grandparents. 

I noticed people are happy and having fun.  The smallest of things seems to magnify my loss.


They say it is a normal reaction to loss.


I’ll be updating these posts as I receive links to colleague’s blog posts. Keep an eye out for these!

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Thought of the Day – Mini Blog Series (Intro)

Hi everyone!

I know, I’ve been quiet for a while, but I hope you’ve been enjoying the Practical Steps to Blogging posts from colleagues that have completed my workshop with onlinevents.

In this post, I’d like to introduce a new series, possibly ongoing for the next few months to a year. Maybe longer, let’s see how this goes!

My thinking with this series is that I’ve written over 200 blog posts since July 31st 2017, and there’s a lot of content there to expand on and explore further.

So, I’m going to be digging into each blog post, from the first one to the last one, and write some “thoughts for the day” to help me and whoever reads these posts to reflect on self-care, mental wellbeing, supervision, and other topics (thanks to my followers by email and on social media by the way, your support is fully appreciated and so are your comments!).

I do hope you enjoy these mini-blogs.

I look forward to your comments on social media or at the bottom of the posts.

I’d also like to welcome suggestions on topics you might want me to discuss in these mini blogs.

I’m not sure yet of the frequency, I’m going to test it out for every other day, we’ll see what happens!

For now, I leave you with my blog subscription form so you can continue to receive these in your inbox as they are published.

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Blog Post Showcase: Thoughts from Kalpna Hirani

Kalpna Psychology Today Profile – Click Image Above

Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

Today I’ll be sharing Kalpna’s social media posts, so you can find her on social media and follow her for more great content!


Facebook post – Click the Banner

Kalpna urges us to reflect on our thinking and why it matters when responding to what goes on around us, what people tell us, what we hear, and what we perceive.

Kalpna’s Facebook Page

Kalpna’s LinkedIn Profile


LinkedIn Post – click the banner

I’ll be updating these posts as I receive links to colleague’s blog posts. Keep an eye out for these!

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Blog Post Showcase: Is trouble sleeping keeping you up at night? – 5 Practical Tips for getting a good night’s sleep, written by: Haley Ruth


Hello everyone, and welcome to Wednesday’s new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this week’s post, Haley gives us some helpful tips on how to get a good night’s sleep.



Haley goes straight into the five tips in this post.

She’s quick to remind us that everyone is different, and it’s important that you find the things that will help you as an individual.

Perhaps these 5 tips will prompt you to think about how you can help yourself get a better night’s sleep?

I hope so. Enjoy the post!



I’ll be updating these posts as I receive links to colleague’s blog posts. Keep an eye out for these!

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Blog Post Showcase: 5 reasons why you’re not into self-care; Written by Lizandra Leigertwood


Hello everyone, and welcome to this ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In today’s post, Lizandra talks about a topic that’s very dear to my heart. I’ve got a series of blog posts on this topic, as well as a book, which you can find in my blogsite and in my amazon author page.



Lizandra starts out reframing the true meaning of self-care, rather than sticking with the cliche that it’s become, “diluting” it’s purpose in our lives.

Read on to find out the real meaning behind self-care, and how forgetting to look after yourself might impact on your psychological, physical and relational life.

Finally, Lizandra gives us 5 reasons why we’re not into self-care.

I hope this post helps you reflect on how you look after yourself, and that you might be able to allow yourself some more time, time that you deserve!



I’ll be updating these posts as I receive links to colleague’s blog posts. Keep an eye out for these!

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Video post showcase: why do you self-sabotage potential relationships, Vlog by Ryan Grey.


Hello everyone, and welcome to this new ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this week’s post, I’m sharing Ryan Grey’s Vlog titled “why do you self-sabotage potential relationships”.

You can find out more about Ryan Grey’s counselling practice via this link.



I’ll be updating these posts as I receive links to colleague’s blog posts. Keep an eye out for these!

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Blog Post Showcase – Low self esteem: a self help guide, written by Kathy Shaw


Hello everyone, and welcome to this ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.

In this week’s post, Katy talks to us about low self-esteem, and gives us a self-help guide to working through this particular issue.



Katy gently takes us through the different aspects of self-esteem: what is it? what affects it? how does it affect us?

Then Katy gives us some tips to improve our self-esteem, breaking it down into 8 different things we can do to help ourselves.

Have a read of the full post here.



I’ll be updating these posts as I receive links to colleague’s blog posts. Keep an eye out for these!

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Blog post showcase: whose space is it anyway? by: Manda Glanfield


Hello everyone, and welcome to this ongoing series, where I’ll be showcasing the blog posts that the graduates of my workshop via onlinevents experiential workshops have written.



Today’s post comes from Manda Glandfield, and is all about how we manage our physical and personal space, especially in light of the social distancing guidance.

I love the title, as it’s similar to one of mine – mine is about relationships. You can read it here.

Manda, through a personal anecdote, shows us how she went from anxious to finding her peace in a busy street, and helps us explore how we can find that for ourselves as well, in whatever way works best for us.

She sets a balance between being separated from others, and our human need for connection. She leaves us with a question about how to move forward…



I’ll be updating these posts as I receive links to colleague’s blog posts. Keep an eye out for these!

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